A Dog Escapes the deadly clutches of a Wild Python

A dog has miraculously avoided becoming a huge pythons meal – after his owner whacked it with a leafy branch.

The distressed dog can be seen in the deadly clutches of the python as it begins to constrict its prey to death.

But the heroic owner – who has not been named – quickly grabs a nearby branch and begins hitting the lengthy python with it in Karnataka, India.

And the act works, as the stunned python begins uncoiling and slowly slithers away.

We bring you the weirdest, wackiest and most bizarre stories from around the world. Stay tuned for daily uploads that you simply have to see to believe.  Check here for more information:  Twitter: https://twitter.com/caters_news   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/catersnews Website: http://www.catersnews.com

Educating Children with Climate Information via CBS Miami

US President Barack Obama walks off Air Force One at Miami International Airport in Miami on May 27, 2015 as he arrives to attend fundraisers and receive the yearly hurricane preparedness briefing. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama arrives to attend fundraisers and receive the yearly hurricane preparedness briefing:

US President Barack Obama walks off Air Force One at Miami International Airport in Miami on May 27, 2015 as he arrives to attend fundraisers and receive the yearly hurricane preparedness briefing.

MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) —  In his second day in South Florida, President Barack Obama will be using his annual hurricane briefing to warn about climate changes and its effect on hurricanes.

Obama is getting the briefing on the hurricane season during a visit Thursday to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Government weather forecasters on Wednesday predicted six to 11 storms this season, with three to six of them developing into hurricanes. The season starts next week.

Obama will talk about what the federal government and local communities are doing to prepare for climate change.

CLICK HERE FOR THE CBS4 HURRICANE GUIDEFeatured Image -- 7585

CLICK HERE FOR CBSMIAMI’s HURRICANE PREPS

CLICK HERE FOR CBSMIAMI’s HURRICANE NEWS  He was speaking at the Hay Festival alongside ‘cli-fi’ authors George Marshall and Saci Lloyd.’  May 28, 2015 by bjjangles

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Great Pacific Garbage Patch(es)

Something extremely horrifying has come to my attention recently. I do not know how I had not know this before, but there is a giant swirling pile of trash in the Pacific. Two, to be exact, east and west.

Size and Scope

The state of our oceans is no secret. They are in obvious peril from so many factors like dredging, overfishing, coral bleaching, acidification, you name it and it is probably affect our oceans and coasts.  Farther down below you will see a snippet of the edge of a garbage patch. Scientists believe the patch itself is 2x the size of Texas.  The contents of the patch is mainly pelagic plastics, such as water bottles, plastic bags, styrofoam and bottle caps with another 700,000+ tons of fishing net thrown in.  It is not entirely correct to call this garbage patch, well, a garbage patch. Using this term implies an island of trash floating in the ocean but really its like a giant plastic soup just spinning around in the pacific. All of these plastics and other pieces of trash not only cover a huge surface area, also reach down 10 meters below the surface as well. The fact so much of the debris is below the surface, it is impossible for scientists to calculate the area of the patch. The patch itself is located in the Pacific, where the North Pacific Gyre, keeps the trash swirling around in the middle of the ocean until eventually some sinks to the ocean floor and more trash is added to replace the sunken trash. Due to such a large amount of trash eventually sinking ~70%, scientists predict there is a huge garbage heap at the bottom of the Pacific as well.

Environmental Effects

So what kind of chaos is all of this debris creating? A lot.  The patch wreaks havoc on the ocean environment, already such a delicate system. The debris can be mistaken for jellyfish by sea turtles, and fish eggs by Albatrosses due to much of the plastics being tiny broken up pieces. The Albatrosses end up feeding the plastics to their chicks, which results in starvation and ruptured organs. There is also a problem of “ghost fishing” in the Patch. This is where nets are still continuing to “fish” even after they have been discarded. Sea turtles and marine mammals get tangled in these nets and often drown.

The debris even disturbs the food web. Broken down pieces of plastics, microplastics, prevents sunlight from reaching algae and plankton below. Algae and plankton are the base of the ocean food chain. Without their existence life in the oceans would eventually cease to exist because the health and amount of algae and planktons affect each and every level.

As if it wasn’t already bad enough, the plastics swimming around out there leach out and absorb harmful chemicals through photodegradation. They leach out BPA’s which create environment and health problems and absorb pollutants like PCB’s. These chemicals are then eaten and consumed by marine life, and then later humans. This fact alone makes it in our best interest to try and clean the mess. But cleaning the Patch is as monstrous a task as the Patch is large.

Cleaning

No country wishes to take credit for the Patch. Who would? It is a horrible thing and nobody wishes to claim it. The fact it is so far from any one countries shore prevents countries from taking responsibility to clean it, like siblings and a spilled carton of milk saying whoever is closer is the one who needs to clean it. Cleaning it would be a monumental task in terms of manpower and finances leaving one big dent in the wallet book.

The area is constantly shifting and moving. It is never in the same spot, making locating and cleaning even more difficult. To top it off, cleaning up the debris is not as simple as just skimming the surface as I myself had thought before doing the research. Many of the debris are small, as are many marine organisms. Scooping up garbage would scoop them up too which would be doubly harmful for the ocean.

What to do?

The best that we can do is reduce our use of plastics, and clean any litter we see until a plan of action can be determined to tackle the Patch. I believe if the worlds nations work together, each donating time, money, and resources, the Patch can be removed. It may not take a short time, it may take several years, but it would be progress nonetheless. It is absurd for countries to not contribute to clean this problem. After all, cleaning the Patch would benefit everyone not just one country. We all need and depend on the oceans for food, commerce, and pure ecological benefits such as the oceans huge part in the carbon cycle. We all should contribute to the idea of a once again clean and healthy ocean.

the ocean idea

Something extremely horrifying has come to my attention recently. I do not know how I had not know this before, but there is a giant swirling pile of trash in the Pacific. Two, to be exact, east and west.

Size and Scope

The state of our oceans is no secret. They are in obvious peril from so many factors like dredging, overfishing, coral bleaching, acidification, you name it and it is probably affect our oceans and coasts.  Farther down below you will see a snippet of the edge of a garbage patch. Scientists believe the patch itself is 2x the size of Texas.  The contents of the patch is mainly pelagic plastics, such as water bottles, plastic bags, styrofoam and bottle caps with another 700,000+ tons of fishing net thrown in.  It is not entirely correct to call this garbage patch, well, a garbage patch. Using this term implies an…

View original post 677 more words

A few reasons not to hate the tourists in your city, even though you want to

Featured Image -- 7746

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There’s now one more reason to avoid Victoria’s tourist-swarmed downtown core this summer.

Volunteers in 1940s-style British “bobby” uniforms — complete with egg-shaped hats — will be walking the beat “armed only with a smile, interesting historical facts and crime prevention information,” according to police. It’s an effort to make out-of-towners feel even more like they’ve escaped to a west-coast Pleasantville.      And it’s another reason to hate on tourists:

You know, the camera-toting (don’t you have a smartphone?!), meanderers clad in comfortable shoes, clogging the seawall in Vancouver and the streets of Kensington Market in Toronto. Also known, to one friend, as “THE WORST SIDEWALK WALKERS!”Screen Shot 2015-02-08 at 15.21.59

 They don’t know where they’re going, or how to get there. They turn our cities into marketing fluff and our streets into parking lots for tour buses.

But in our annoyance, we forget: We are tourists, too.

Canadians are the seventh-largest spenders on travel in the world, to the tune of $37 billion in 2014.

The golden rule of a good trip is good people. That could be a travel buddy or a hostel crew, but it’s also often the locals. In Lisbon, Portugal, my sister and I made friends out of people who showed us the hidden bars and late-night hangouts, the beaches a short drive out of town, the best places to catch the sunset.Screen Shot 2015-02-08 at 15.23.30

That’s the hipster way to travel these days — getting the “local” experience. But we forget it relies on locals treating us, the tourists, like the potentially interesting humans we are.

I try to be kind to tourists, sometimes. I’ll offer directions or tips on what to see and eat. But I’ve never looked at a tourist as a potential friend. And I’ve never been the source of someone’s amazing story of travel to Canada.

There is another reason to stop hating tourists: They brought in $17.3 billion in 2014. You’ve heard this before, but many people’s livelihoods depend on them.

Yes, it is irritating to see my hometown become even more of a caricature of imagined Englishness. I didn’t think Victoria could grovel any harder at the feet of its British roots. It can.

But whatever I think of the volunteer bobby idea, it’s time to shed the haughty gaze at the wayward tourist. There’s no point having a superiority complex if you don’t help make your city a nice place to be.

More from metronews.ca

Related:  TNT Powertrain travel & tourism info

Climate: Is this the Antarctic tipping point?

dfsg

Staff Report

FRISCO — Along with studies showing dramatic changes in individual ice shelves in Antarctica, new research shows widespread changes in the region since 2009. Up until then, the Southern Antarctic Peninsula showed no signs of change.

But suddenly, multiple glaciers along a vast coastal expanse, measuring some 750km in length, suddenly started to shed ice into the ocean at a nearly constant rate of 60 cubic kilometers, or about 55 trillion liters of water, each year. This makes the region the second largest contributor to sea level rise in Antarctica and the ice loss shows no sign of waning.

“The fact that so many glaciers in such a large region suddenly started to lose ice came as a surprise to us,” said Dr. Bert Wouters, a Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Bristol, who lead the study. “It shows a very fast response of the ice sheet: in just a few years the dynamic regime completely shifted.”

The research, published in Science, is based on measurements made by a suite of satellites, including CryoSat-2, which can measure the elevation of the ice sheet with pinpoint accuracy using radar pulses.

By analyzing roughly 5 years of the data, the researchers found that the ice surface of some of the glaciers is currently going down by as much as 4m each year.

The ice loss in the region is so large that it causes small changes in the gravity field of the Earth, which can be detected by another satellite mission, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE).

“To date, the glaciers added roughly 300 cubic km of water to the ocean. That’s the equivalent of the volume of nearly 350,000 Empire State Buildings combined,” Wouters said.

Data from an Antarctic climate model shows that the sudden change cannot be explained by changes in snowfall or air temperature. Instead, the team attributes the rapid ice loss to warming oceans.

Many of the glaciers in the region feed into ice shelves that float on the surface of the ocean. They act as a buttress to the ice resting on bedrock inland, slowing down the flow of the glaciers into the ocean.

The westerly winds that encircle Antarctica have strengthened in recent decades, in response to climate warming and ozone depletion. The stronger winds push warm waters from the Southern Ocean poleward, where they eat away at the glaciers and floating ice shelves from below.

The floating ice shelves in the region have lost almost one-fifth of their thickness in the last two decades, offering less resistance to the land-based glaciers. According to the researchers, a key concern is that much of the ice of the Southern Antarctic Peninsula is grounded on bedrock below sea level, which gets deeper inland. This means that even if the glaciers retreat, the warm water will chase them inland and melt them even more.

“It appears that sometime around 2009, the ice shelf thinning and the subsurface melting of the glaciers passed a critical threshold which triggered the sudden ice loss,” Wouters said. “However, compared to other regions in Antarctica, the Southern Peninsula is rather understudied, exactly because it did not show any changes in the past, ironically.

“To pinpoint the cause of the changes, more data need to be collected. A detailed knowledge of the geometry of the local ice shelves, the ocean floor topography, ice sheet thickness and glacier flow speeds are crucial to tell how much longer the thinning will continue.”

Summit County Citizens Voice

Study shows widespread, simultaneous ice shelf melting

dfsg Satellite data shows sudden shift in ice shelf dynamics along the southern Antarctic Peninsula. @berwyn photo.

Staff Report

FRISCO — Along with studies showing dramatic changes in individual ice shelves in Antarctica, new research shows widespread changes in the region since 2009. Up until then, the Southern Antarctic Peninsula showed no signs of change.

But suddenly, multiple glaciers along a vast coastal expanse, measuring some 750km in length, suddenly started to shed ice into the ocean at a nearly constant rate of 60 cubic kilometers, or about 55 trillion liters of water, each year. This makes the region the second largest contributor to sea level rise in Antarctica and the ice loss shows no sign of waning.

View original post 479 more words

Overdevelopment, Overpopulation, Overshoot: Humans’ staggering effect on Earth

Tuluwat Examiner

speakout

Pictures are worth a thousand words.

Our response to these idiotic comments on our “climate hawk” post click on the link a view the slide show.

“More Liberal nonsense.I often wonder why Liberals hate people and freedom so much, yet love oppressive Govt.
We are carbon based life forms, a tax on carbon is a tax on life itself.”

“If you believe humans are affecting the climate I’ve got a bridge to sell you. The past recent warming from the 1930’s up until 2017 was solely due to the activity of the sun. The CO2 increase in the atmosphere was solely due to the sun warming the world’s oceans and not the CO2 expended by humans burning fossil fuels.”

View slide show here:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/humans-staggering-effect-on-earth/2015/05/13/01c9b7e2-f974-11e4-9030-b4732caefe81_gallery.html?hpid=z9

Images of consumption are the theme of the book, “Overdevelopment, Overpopulation, Overshoot.” It addresses environmental deterioration through subjects including materialism, consumption, pollution, fossil fuels and carbon…

View original post 55 more words

CIA climate research effort decommissioned

Watts Up With That?

Seal of the US Central Intelligence Agency. Author United States Government, public domain image. Seal of the US Central Intelligence Agency. Author United States Government, public domain image.

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Mother Jones reports that the CIA Medea programme, a climate research effort which involved providing civilian experts with access to classified information, is to be shut down.

According to Mother Jones;

The program was originally launched in 1992 during the George H.W. Bush administration and was later shut down during President George W. Bush’s term. It was re-launched under the Obama administration in 2010, with the aim of providing security clearances to roughly 60 climate scientists. Those scientists were given access to classified information that could be useful for researching global warming and tracking environmental changes that could have national security implications.

Read more: http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2015/05/cia-closing-its-main-climate-research-program

Some experts have expressed surprise the Medea programme is being shut down. But the programme is not without its critics.

Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, a 23-year veteran of…

View original post 129 more words

Planes, Fog, and How the Irish Saved Civilization

After checking out the Crested Butte Library’s entire selection of Irish authors and histories of Ireland, I proceeded to read approximately none of the six books I so eagerly grabbed from the library. Life (and a mild concussion) kept me occupied the past two weeks.

Fortunately, crossing most of the continental USA and Atlantic takes time—time I spent reading (and thinking about future blog posts). I figured I’d start with Thomas Cahill’s book:How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland’s Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe because it was the first book my librarian recommended when I asked her what to read to learn about Ireland.

Cahill tells a beautiful story about St. Patrick and the conversion of the Irish ‘barbarians’ into a diverse society of generous, hopeful saints and scholars who preserved the scaffolding of western civilization during the dark ages. Cahill is a masterful storyteller and I encourage everyone to read his book (a breeze at only 218 pages). It provides a fascinating picture of Irish society from the rise of the Roman Empire to that of Medieval Europe.

For my part, rather than continuing to bore you with summaries, I thought I’d give you lovely readers a taste of one of my favorite parts of Cahill’s depiction of the Irish, his descriptions of the remarkable women present in Irish poetry.

Cahill is kind enough to put entire passages of epic poems into his work. One such epic, theTain Bo Cuailnge, The Cattle Raid of Cooley, revolves in large part around the Irish Queen Medb (a synonym of Mead!). Medb is pretty much the 1st century’s Beyoncé except instead of claiming: the shoes on my feet, I bought ‘em; Medb is all:

When we were promised, I brought you the best wedding gift a bride can bring: apparel enough for a dozen men, a chariot worth thrice seven bondmaids, the width of your face of red gold and the weight of your left arm of light gold. So, if anyone causes you shame or upset or trouble, the right to compensation is mine, for you’re a kept man [Cahill, 72]

She continues in this brazen vein—making innuendos, proclaiming her wealth and starting battles, and in doing so appears entirely human. Medb is the opposite of the needy, two-dimensional female characters common in the classical literature written at the same time. Moreover, she is not the only strong female character present in old Irish literature. Cahill provides numerous examples of strong women who, when faced with the death of their loved ones, respond with spectacular laments that display the hard, unbending stock they come from.

The strong Irish women portrayed in these epics delight the feminist in me. Even though women were by no means equal to men, they seem to have had a lot better of a position in Ireland; in fact, some of them even became woman Bishops.

I will get into more of that later. For now, I’d like to report that we’ve successfully arrived and survived the first day in the Emerald Isle (I use the word ‘survive’ earnestly, jet lag is no joke on your first day in a different country). Today was a trip into the fog: figuratively, in the sense that my mind is being bogged down by a thick and cloying exhaustion; and literally, in the sense that driving to the Cliffs of Moher was the equivalent of driving through clam chowder.

I’m a little tired but didn’t want to sink into slumber until I shared a few photos of our first day and welcome dinner in Galway. Courtesy of the Mad Hattler

Burren
Looking out over Galway Bay
Gigi&Erin
The quintessential Irish experience– a pint of Guinness at the pub with Mary Pittman, Mary Timony, JeanAnne Hattler & Me (the Mad Hattler).
Drinks(2)
(L-R) Hugh & Betty Deithorn, Mike Altrudo, Ron Surmacz, Maria Altrudo, Stephen & Susan Munson Bagnato
Drinks (x3)
(L-R) Carol & John Livingston, Marcelle Theis & Jim Altzner, Stephanie & Dave Iauco
(l-r) Tony & Lisa Plastino, Linda & Don Dietz
(l-r) Tony & Lisa Plastino, Linda & Don Dietz
(l-r) Beth Wurzel, Margaret Terbell, Carolyn & Rachel Mariano, Michele Forte
(l-r) Beth Wurzel, Margaret Terbell, Carolyn & Rachel Mariano, Michele Forte
Looking out over the Burren, a geological phenomena unique to western Ireland
Looking out over the Burren, a geological phenomena unique to western Ireland
The obligatory Irish castle picture. It's like the flag knew we were coming.
The obligatory Irish castle picture. It’s like the flag knew we were coming.

Until tomorrow, sweet dreams!

Xx

MAY 22, 2015

The Mad Hattler

on the road with Duquesne University Alumni & Friends

After checking out the Crested Butte Library’s entire selection of Irish authors and histories of Ireland, I proceeded to read approximately none of the six books I so eagerly grabbed from the library. Life (and a mild concussion) kept me occupied the past two weeks.

Fortunately, crossing most of the continental USA and Atlantic takes time—time I spent reading (and thinking about future blog posts). I figured I’d start with Thomas Cahill’s book: How the Irish Saved Civilization: The Untold Story of Ireland’s Heroic Role from the Fall of Rome to the Rise of Medieval Europe because it was the first book my librarian recommended when I asked her what to read to learn about Ireland.

Cahill tells a beautiful story about St. Patrick and the conversion of the Irish ‘barbarians’ into a diverse society of generous, hopeful saints and scholars who preserved the scaffolding of western civilization during the…

View original post 571 more words

Pope Francis and the Environment: Why His New Climate Encyclical Matters

The Intersection of Science Religion, Politics & Ethics via Yale University: In the summer of 2015, Pope Francis is expected to issue a Papal Encyclical on the environment, in which he is expected to declare climate action a moral imperative for the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics. This panel of experts from across several disciplines at Yale discusses the potential implications of this event–and how it might transform the global climate debate for Catholics and non-Catholics alike.

North Shore, Oahu

sunriseshell

sea turtle 4

sea turtle 2

sea turtle 5

sea turtle 6

sea turtle

sea sluggie

The sea turtles were a lovely reflection about this diving excursion. I ran into some unusual things as well.  Such as sea slugs that squirt ink if alarmed and giant triangle rock formations.

wtf

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Baby sloth advocates for a new park via Conservation International (CI)

http://www.conservation.org
This baby sloth is advocating for the creation of a park in the Paramaribo, Suriname! The park would be a safe haven for sloths and other animals, and would also provide ecotourism opportunities.POSTER-Z-PINK-OUTLINE

Monique Pool, founder of Green Heritage Fun Suriname, rescued many sloths after an area of forest within Paramaribo was cut down. Learn more about her sanctuary and advocacy efforts in our full video:

In search of Scotland’s best beach via Julian Worker / Writer

On a road trip along Scotland’s north-west coast Kevin Rushby and family search for great swimming and wild camping spots – and a legendary beach, Sandwood Bay, at the tip of the countryMaddy and Kevin explore a the opening of a gorge at Applecross.

I first heard of it many years ago while sitting on a beach in the Far East. We had palm trees, white sand and aquamarine water where turtles swam – and there was a Scotsman, freckled and sunburned, arguing that his homeland had better. “Like Sandwood Bay,” he said. “Best beach in the world – and it feels like the last one, too. It’s a hike to get there. You should make the pilgrimage.”368c648c-546b-4ed2-b9c1-838a2afeb85b-2060x1236

The name stuck in my mind and, over the years, other people mentioned the place: its legendary beauty, its wonderful isolation, and its burgeoning reputation. But it was not until I was searching the west coast for wild-swimming spots between Applecross and Cape Wrath that I found its actual location: the last splash of yellow sand before the top north-west corner of Britain, with a four-mile footpath snaking across the hills to reach it. The whole nature of the trip changed right then. We would do the pilgrimage, working our way north, searching for great swimming and wild-camping spots, and finish at the ultima thule, the legendary goal of wilderness lovers: Sandwood Bay.
http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2015/may/10/scotland-beach-swimming-wild-camping

Julian Worker Travel - A few ideas for your next trip in every direction

On a road trip along Scotland’s north-west coast Kevin Rushby and family search for great swimming and wild camping spots – and a legendary beach, Sandwood Bay, at the tip of the country.

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A preview of the 2015 Central Pacific Hurricane Season

The 2015 Central Pacific Hurricane Season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

There is a good relation of El Nino years to increased hurricane activity.

The average number of tropical depressions, tropical storms and hurricanes is about four to five per year.

But when you look at El Nino years, in some cases, the number of storms has doubled. For example:

  • 1982: 10 with a direct hit from Hurricane IwaFeatured Image
  • 1992: 11 with a direct hit from Hurricane Iniki

We’ve gone through seasons with a high number of storms and no direct hits, such as 11 in 1994 and seven in 2009.

Then last year, which was a weak El Nino year, there were five storm systems with Tropical Storm Iselle hitting the southern tip of the Big Island.

El Nino causes warmer temperatures in the Pacific northern hemisphere and warm water makes storms spawn and survive.

Even last year with a weak El Nino, 22 systems were born in the East Pacific, the fourth highest on record.

According to the Climate Prediction Center, there is a 90-percent chance that El Nino will continue through this summer and an 80-percent chance through next year.

It won’t mean that we will get a direct hit, only that there is a higher chance of tropical cyclone formation for this hurricane season.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Forecast will be released May 26.

 

Kevin Richardson is a South African Lion Tamer

Kevin Richardson is a South African animal behaviorist who has worked extensively with native animals of Africa. He has been accepted into several clans of spotted hyenas and prides of lions.Featured image

Lions are some of the most dangerous animals know to man. BUT there is one man who is part of their pride. Kevin Richardson,an outdoorsman who lives just 30 miles north of Johannesburg,has an amazing ability to communicate with some of Africas most feared predators. His conversation area is home to lions,hyenas,cheetahs,leopards and panthers. He is able to live with them,sleep curled up with them,swim with lionesses,caress cubs and tussle with males. This exciting and touching series will take viewers on a journey to the stunning African wilderness,giving them an exclusive insight into the life of the real Lion Whisperer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kevin_Ri…)
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