Chile’s Thunderstorm

CHILE’S THUNDERSTORM IS THE MESMERIZING RESULT OF VOLCANIC CHAOS

The video below, filmed by Chilean cinematographer Christian Muñoz-Donoso reveals the super-charged volcanic ash cloud appeared during an eruption at Volcán Calbuco, one of Chile’s most dangerous volcanos, earlier this year.

According to BBC Earth, dirty thunderstorms, also known as volcanic lightning, are rare phenomena that occur during large eruptions when lightning is sparked within clouds of volcanic ash.

Although very little is known about volcanic lightning, scientists believe the electric charges are generated when ash, rock fragments and ice particles collide within the volcanic plume, according to National Geographic.

“In a normal thunderstorm, ice crystals collide and generate electric charges,” volcano filmmaker Marc Szeglat,  who was not involved in filming the below clip, told BBC Earth earlier this year. “In an eruption cloud, ash particles collide instead of ice crystals.”

When Muñoz-Donoso filmed Calbuco’s volcanic lightning in April, it was the first time the volcano had erupted in 42 years, forcing thousands to evacuate and leaving the surrounding areas covered in thick ash. Fortunately, no deaths or injuries were reported.

Watch Chile’s hypnotizing and powerful “dirty thunderstorm” in full video below.

Super-charged volcanic ash cloud sparked with lightning in Pat…Be amazed by a super-charged volcanic ash cloud sparked by lightning.#PATAGONIA  Courtesy of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed courtesy of: emiliocogliani.wordpress.com

Dancing with Dolphins

DANCING WITH DOLPHINS potato animated GIF

Good morning/afternoon/night, friends!  I hope you’re enjoying this first full week of Fall.  Here in Texas, I’m not feeling much of a difference in temperature (given we experience a season/ season and a half at most), but I’m ready to welcome one of my favorite months of the year.  While many kick off the season travelling to places that require a jacket, or at least a jumper, I kicked off the end of summer by going to the beach, Cayman Islands that is, for board meetings.
The results? After just one week, I have come back brown and burnt…but it’s all good.  One of the absolute highlights of my trip was my time playing with dolphins.  Since I was a little (albeit big) girl, I always dreamed of swimming with dolphins.  I still remember my dismay as a third grader when I found out that swimming with dolphins was cancelled due to inclement weather.  I decided to make up for it in a big way, and if you are ever visiting Cayman, DO IT!!  While this is not necessarily a fashion post, and apologies for looking horrendous in my pictures, I wanted to share a fun de-stresser and encourage you all to find a way to de-stress this week.  I decided to go for the top package, which allowed me to play and even do a lift with two dolphins.  It is amazing how intuitive and intelligent dolphins are, and getting kissed by a dolphin has a way of relaxing you…even when work is tough. My favorite dolphin, Luna, was labelled the old, crazy dolphin, so naturally I preferred her to Luca.  Wonder why…
The amazing part was the fact that I virtually had the experience to myself, and the trainer was so knowledgeable and was all about having a laugh. For my fellow bloggers, rest assured that they will have a photographer dedicated to capturing your moment….even if you’re travelling alone like I was.
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If you’re headed to the area, click here for more info!
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With your entrance fee, you even get access to the turtle farm.  It is amazing to see hundreds of enormous turtles.  If you’re brave like I am, you can even swim (and yes kiss) your very own turtle.
Hope you all have a fabulous Tuesday, and I hope you take a moment to de-stress!  Have any tips?!? I’d love to hear them!!

Let’s get connected friends!

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Twitter:@MiraHaykal

Admirably Legal

Good morning/afternoon/night, friends!  I hope you’re enjoying this first full week of Fall.  Here in Texas, I’m not feeling much of a difference in temperature (given we experience a season/ season and a half at most), but I’m ready to welcome one of my favorite months of the year.  While many kick off the season travelling to places that require a jacket, or at least a jumper, I kicked off the end of summer by going to the beach, Cayman Islands that is, for board meetings.
The results? After just one week, I have come back brown and burnt…but it’s all good.  One of the absolute highlights of my trip was my time playing with dolphins.  Since I was a little (albeit big) girl, I always dreamed of swimming with dolphins.  I still remember my dismay as a third grader when I found out that swimming with dolphins was cancelled due to inclement weather.  I…

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Today’s Inspiration

livethestoke

afraid

“Always do what you are afraid to do.”  -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Don’t forget to FOLLOW, LIKE, and RE-POST!

-FINN-

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Time: A Gift

Shots from a walk in Guy Fawkes River National Park, including the Ebor Falls. So great to be able to take time in a busy week to take photos. via Monk Seal.

I think every individual has his or her own power, and it’s a matter of working, taking time and defining what that power is. – Jill Scott.

The Waterfall  

(Henry Kendall)

The song of the water
Doomed ever to roam,
A beautiful exile,
Afar from its home.

The cliffs on the mountain,
The grand and the gray,
They took the bright creature
And hurled it away!

I heard the wild downfall,
And knew it must spill
A passionate heart out
All over the hill.

pengenie

Photography: Trish Jean

Shots from a walk in Guy Fawkes River National Park, including the Ebor Falls. So great to be able to take time in a busy week to take photos. It’s a mindful activity and makes up for not having time to be in the water, my zen thing, and no baths in the hotels! It’s also great for bringing attention to the places I’m travelling through.

I think every individual has his or her own power, and it’s a matter of working, taking time and defining what that power is. – Jill Scott

I think my superpower is compassion. There’s been a lot of need for that this week, and stopping and taking photos and having time out is the gift of compassion to myself. I’m grateful my travelling companion is a wonderful, compassionate man. So was the man I was working with last week. They’ve both…

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Canadians kidnapped in the Philippines: Here’s what you need to know

image
Pic courtesy of Global News & Sier’s Poetry

Why two Canadians were kidnapped from a resort area in the southern Philippines Monday, and by whom, is still unknown. But the area of the Philippines where the abduction took place has a long history of armed violence.

Source: Canadians kidnapped in the Philippines: Here’s what you need to know

Severe El Niño events will lead to coastal flooding and erosion

Map courtesy NOAA

The projected upsurge of severe El Niño and La Niña events will cause an increase in storm events leading to extreme coastal flooding and erosion in populated regions across the Pacific Ocean, according to a multi-agency study published Monday in Nature Geoscience.

The impact of these storms is not presently included in most studies on future coastal vulnerability, which look primarily at sea level rise. New research data, from 48 beaches across three continents — including Hawaii — and five countries bordering the Pacific Ocean, suggest the predicted increase will exacerbate coastal erosion irrespective of sea level rise affecting the region.

Researchers from 13 different institutions analyzed coastal data from across the Pacific Ocean basin from 1979 to 2012. The scientists sought to determine if patterns in coastal change could be connected to major climate cycles.

Although previous studies have analyzed coastal impacts at local and regional levels, this is the first to pull together data from across the Pacific to determine basin-wide patterns. The research group determined all Pacific Ocean regions investigated were affected during either an El Niño or La Niña year.

When the west coast of the U.S. mainland and Canada, Hawaii, and northern Japan felt the coastal impacts of El Niño, characterized by bigger waves, different wave direction, higher water levels and/or erosion, the opposite region in the Southern Hemisphere of New Zealand and Australia experienced “suppression,” such as smaller waves and less erosion.10881697_595527693881949_8814641042094097058_n

The pattern then generally flips: during La Niña, the Southern Hemisphere experienced more severe conditions.

The published paper, “Coastal vulnerability across the Pacific dominated by El Niño/Southern Oscillation” is available online.

Abstract: To predict future coastal hazards, it is important to quantify any links between climate drivers and spatial patterns of coastal change. However, most studies of future coastal vulnerability do not account for the dynamic components of coastal water levels during storms, notably wave-driven processes, storm surges and seasonal water level anomalies, although these components can add metres to water levels during extreme events. Here we synthesize multi-decadal, co-located data assimilated between 1979 and 2012 that describe wave climate, local water levels and coastal change for 48 beaches throughout the Pacific Ocean basin. We find that observed coastal erosion across the Pacific varies most closely with El Niño/Southern Oscillation, with a smaller influence from the Southern Annular Mode and the Pacific North American pattern. In the northern and southern Pacific Ocean, regional wave and water level anomalies are significantly correlated to a suite of climate indices, particularly during boreal winter; conditions in the northeast Pacific Ocean are often opposite to those in the western and southern Pacific. We conclude that, if projections for an increasing frequency of extreme El Niño and La Niña events over the twenty-first century are confirmed, then populated regions on opposite sides of the Pacific Ocean basin could be alternately exposed to extreme coastal erosion and flooding, independent of sea-level rise.

Japan Tsunami: Victims remembered

See more: via: www.nature.com

References:

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Baby fox completely tangled in football net set free

This poor fox cub was almost strangled in a football net. He struggled a lot and ended up with the net tightly wrapped all around his body. All of this could have been avoided by, simply, rolling up the net or putting it away. Image result for fox pics

Thanks to the gentleman who spotted him so quickly, the cub was safely freed and released.

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Related: The Pope Visits Cuba via Time.com

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Record breaking HEAT is Resulting Wildfire Damage & Destruction

Western Wildfires Update: Record $243 Million Spent Battling Forest Fires Last Week. Courtesy of: http://www.weather.com.   
Good News in Forecast for Firefighters in Northwest

Cooler and wetter weather in the Northwest will be good news for those fighting several wildfires in the region.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack revealed Thursday a record $243 million was spent last week combatting wildfires raging around the country.

The U.S. Forest Service has been forced to borrow funds from forest restoration work, normally used to reduce the risk of wildfires, as it has already spent all the money allotted by Congress for its 12-month budget. Vilsack noted this has happened the past six of 10 years.

Much to his chagrin, Vilsack said the agency will likely be forced to borrow more funds and continue to expect spending $200 million a week battling the blazes.

(MORE: Air Quality Worse in Some Northwestern Towns Than Beijing)

Firefighters have been making more gains on two massive wildfires burning in north-central Washington.

As of late Thursday night, the Okanogan Complex was 60 percent contained but has grown to nearly 150,000 acres. Last week, it became the largest wildfire in state history.

Officials are managing the complex of fires as one fire, including the Chelan Complex. That particular fire was 70 percent contained and had burned more than 93,000 acres as of Thursday night.

Nearly 2,000 firefighters are working on the two big fire complexes that have burned more than 140 residences. Many other residents are still under evacuation notices.

Fire officials say they are both building lines around the fires and mopping up inside their borders.

Wildfires have taken their toll on the Western landscape this year. They’ve reduced entire neighborhoods to ash, forced thousands to evacuate and required a nonstop battle from countless firefighters, some who have come from other countries to help.

And there’s no indication that fire season is letting up at all.

More than 8.2 million acres have burned in U.S. wildfires this year, according to the National Interagency Fire Center. That’s well above the 10-year average of about 5.57 million acres through Sept. 2. As the Washington Post notes, that’s larger than the total area of Maryland.

There has also been a human toll during this fire season. Five firefighters have been killed in the line of duty this year, according to Wildfire Today. A year ago, there were 10 wildfire-related firefighter deaths, NIFC reported.

There are currently dozens of large wildfires burning across the West; here’s an update on a few of them.

California

A massive Butte fire burned more than 50,000 acres across the counties of Amador and Calaveras near Sacramento.

The blaze has already destroyed 6 structures and was only 10% contained as of September 11. Evacuations were ordered for both counties and over 1,500 fire personnel were dispatched to fight the growing fire.

Officials reported that the steep topography in the area mixed with harsh weather conditions is making the fire grow at an unprecedented rate.

Oregon

Firefighters battling a destructive wildfire near John Day are allowing people who have been evacuated for weeks to return to their homes.

The last evacuation alerts were lifted Wednesday, but residents in several neighborhoods were told to be ready to leave on short notice.

The fire has destroyed 43 homes and burned more than 165 square miles. It is 52 percent contained.

Crews focused Wednesday on containing spot fires that broke out beyond the containment lines during a period of hotter temperatures and lower humidity Tuesday. They were hopeful that cooler, more humid conditions Wednesday would allow firefighters to control the flames and strengthen their containment lines.

Idaho

Fire crews are aggressively working to prevent flames from expanding on a 3-week-old blaze in west-central Idaho that has already burned 143 square miles of dry timber.

More than 900 firefighters are battling the fire, but it was only 30 percent contained. It’s burning in terrain surrounded by large amounts of unburned fuel.

Crews focused their efforts Wednesday on protecting structures along the Salmon River corridor, and rafters were still being stopped and evacuated before entering the fire perimeter.

In northern Idaho, flames crept overnight as close as a mile and a half to the historic Fenn Ranger Station, causing mandatory evacuations.

Idaho currently has 17 large fires, the most in the nation, the National Interagency Fire Center says.

Montana

A firefighter working to battle a wildfire north of Helena has been hospitalized after an ATV crash.

The Helena Independent Record reports that the injured man was adjusting hoses in steep terrain Wednesday at the time of the accident. A nearby firefighter/EMT helped with emergency care before the man was taken to a medical facility in Helena.

A Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation spokeswoman declined to comment on how the accident occurred. Officials have not released the injured man’s name.

By Associated Press
Published Sep 11 2015 06:18 PM EDT
via: weather.com
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