Chemical engineers can help solve the climate challenge #COP21

Posted on 02/12/2015 by

COP21 logoThis week saw the start of the 21st Conference of Parties,COP21. More than 190 countries and 150 global leaders have gathered in Paris, France, to discuss a new global agreement on climate change.

The United Nations (UN) event will host around 40,000 people and runs right through until the end of next week (11 December).

The future of the natural world, and the animals and plant life that call it home, depends on the outcome of this conference. If we don’t limit global warming to 2 degrees, the consequences will be catastrophic.

Polar bearWhilst we cannot accurately predict the scale of any potential impacts now, what we do know for certain is that climate change is happening, and we have a responsibility to reduce any further damage.

Chemical engineers are part of the solution, and the IChemE Energy Centre has identified five priority areas where technology can be deployed now to help mitigate climate change.

These topics, as outlined in the IChemE Energy Centre Climate Communiqué, are:

  • energy efficiency
  • energy storage and grid management
  • carbon capture, storage and utilisation
  • nuclear
  • sustainable bioenergy

Released in a statement today, the Energy Centre says: “The technologies exist now to deliver massive energy savings and greenhouse gas emission reductions in all five priority areas. Taken together, they represent a pathway to a decarbonized energy system that can be realised now, as long as the agreement made at COP21 recognises that the time has come for deployment of such technologies.”

Read the Energy Centre supporting statement here.

Stefaan Simons, Chair of the Energy Centre Board, has also added: “Chemical engineers already understand the technology needed to limit atmospheric CO2 levels. Now is the time to start using it. World leaders can shift the focus from research and development to demonstration and deployment. We can give policy makers the solutions needed to mitigate climate change.”

You can watch Stef, alongside other members of the Energy Centre Board, Niall Mac Dowell and Ben Salisbury, discuss the five topics in more detail in the following video:

Over the next few days, whilst COP21 is still underway, the Energy Centre will be publishing evidence-based recommendations that cover each of the five topics on this very blog.

Stef will also present at the Paris climate talks on 10 December at an official side event: ‘Technology solutions for a 2oC world: Investing in renewables, storage, energy efficiency and CCS‘. So if you are in Paris, please join him.

There will also be an evening screening of the his side event on 10 December at it IChemE’s offices in Portland Place, London, UK – this event is free-of-charge and open to all.

Let’s all be part of the climate conversation, and make sure that the chemical engineering perspective is heard whilst the future of our planet is being decided over the next two weeks.

IChemE

COP21 logoThis week saw the start of the 21st Conference of Parties, COP21. More than 190 countries and 150 global leaders have gathered in Paris, France, to discuss a new global agreement on climate change.

The United Nations (UN) event will host around 40,000 people and runs right through until the end of next week (11 December).

The future of the natural world, and the animals and plant life that call it home, depends on the outcome of this conference. If we don’t limit global warming to 2 degrees, the consequences will be catastrophic.

Polar bearWhilst we cannot accurately predict the scale of any potential impacts now, what we do know for certain is that climate change is happening, and we have a responsibility to reduce any further damage.

Chemical engineers are part of the solution, and the IChemE Energy Centre has identified five priority areas where technology can be deployed now to help…

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Should you Drop out of School?

Everything You Won’t Learn in College About How to Be Successful” by Michael Ellsberg

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“The Education of Millionaires: Everything You Won’t Learn in College About How to Be Successful” by Michael Ellsberg

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Baby fox completely tangled in football net set free

This poor fox cub was almost strangled in a football net. He struggled a lot and ended up with the net tightly wrapped all around his body. All of this could have been avoided by, simply, rolling up the net or putting it away. Image result for fox pics

Thanks to the gentleman who spotted him so quickly, the cub was safely freed and released.

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Ever wanted to see the goings on behind the scenes at a Wildlife Rescue Centre? Well now you can! We have super cute hedgehogs eating their dinner, dramatic rescues of wild deer and everything in between. So click subscribe to keep up to date with our new videos uploaded almost every day!

http://time.com/4041740/pope-francis-us-visit-cuba-mass-attendees/

Related: The Pope Visits Cuba via Time.com

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Educating Children with Climate Information via CBS Miami

US President Barack Obama walks off Air Force One at Miami International Airport in Miami on May 27, 2015 as he arrives to attend fundraisers and receive the yearly hurricane preparedness briefing. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama arrives to attend fundraisers and receive the yearly hurricane preparedness briefing:

US President Barack Obama walks off Air Force One at Miami International Airport in Miami on May 27, 2015 as he arrives to attend fundraisers and receive the yearly hurricane preparedness briefing.

MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) —  In his second day in South Florida, President Barack Obama will be using his annual hurricane briefing to warn about climate changes and its effect on hurricanes.

Obama is getting the briefing on the hurricane season during a visit Thursday to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

Government weather forecasters on Wednesday predicted six to 11 storms this season, with three to six of them developing into hurricanes. The season starts next week.

Obama will talk about what the federal government and local communities are doing to prepare for climate change.

CLICK HERE FOR THE CBS4 HURRICANE GUIDEFeatured Image -- 7585

CLICK HERE FOR CBSMIAMI’s HURRICANE PREPS

CLICK HERE FOR CBSMIAMI’s HURRICANE NEWS  He was speaking at the Hay Festival alongside ‘cli-fi’ authors George Marshall and Saci Lloyd.’  May 28, 2015 by bjjangles

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In search of Scotland’s best beach via Julian Worker / Writer

On a road trip along Scotland’s north-west coast Kevin Rushby and family search for great swimming and wild camping spots – and a legendary beach, Sandwood Bay, at the tip of the countryMaddy and Kevin explore a the opening of a gorge at Applecross.

I first heard of it many years ago while sitting on a beach in the Far East. We had palm trees, white sand and aquamarine water where turtles swam – and there was a Scotsman, freckled and sunburned, arguing that his homeland had better. “Like Sandwood Bay,” he said. “Best beach in the world – and it feels like the last one, too. It’s a hike to get there. You should make the pilgrimage.”368c648c-546b-4ed2-b9c1-838a2afeb85b-2060x1236

The name stuck in my mind and, over the years, other people mentioned the place: its legendary beauty, its wonderful isolation, and its burgeoning reputation. But it was not until I was searching the west coast for wild-swimming spots between Applecross and Cape Wrath that I found its actual location: the last splash of yellow sand before the top north-west corner of Britain, with a four-mile footpath snaking across the hills to reach it. The whole nature of the trip changed right then. We would do the pilgrimage, working our way north, searching for great swimming and wild-camping spots, and finish at the ultima thule, the legendary goal of wilderness lovers: Sandwood Bay.
http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2015/may/10/scotland-beach-swimming-wild-camping

Julian Worker Travel - A few ideas for your next trip in every direction

On a road trip along Scotland’s north-west coast Kevin Rushby and family search for great swimming and wild camping spots – and a legendary beach, Sandwood Bay, at the tip of the country.

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28 Internet acronyms every parent should know

28 Internet acronyms every parent should know
Advertisement  By Kelly Wallace

If you think you are tech savvy all because you know what “LOL” means, let me test your coolness. Any idea what “IWSN” stands for in Internet slang? It’s a declarative statement: I want sex now. If it makes you feel any better, I had no clue, and neither did a number of women I asked about it.

Acronyms are widely popular across the Internet, especially on social media and texting apps, because, in some cases, they offer a shorthand for communication that is meant to be instant.

So “LMK” — let me know — and “WYCM” — will you call me? — are innocent enough.

But the issue, especially for parents, is understanding the slang that could signal some dangerous teen behavior, such as “GNOC,’” which means “get naked on camera.”

And it certainly helps for a parent to know that “PIR” means parent in room, which could mean the teen wants to have a conversation about things that his or her mom and dad might not approve of.

Katie Greer is a national Internet safety expert who has provided Internet and technology safety training to schools, law enforcement agencies and community organizations throughout the country for more than seven years.

She says research shows that a majority of teens believe that their parents are starting to keep tabs on their online and social media lives.

“With that, acronyms can be used by kids to hide certain parts of their conversations from attentive parents,” Greer said. “Acronyms used for this purpose could potentially raise some red flags for parents.”

But parents would drive themselves crazy, she said, if they tried to decode every text, email and post they see their teen sending or receiving.

“I’ve seen some before and it’s like ‘The Da Vinci Code,’ where only the kids hold the true meanings (and most of the time they’re fairly innocuous),” she said.

Still, if parents come across any acronyms they believe could be problematic, they should talk with their kids about them, said Greer.

But how, on earth, is a parent to keep up with all these acronyms, especially since new ones are being introduced every day?

“It’s a lot to keep track of,” Greer said. Parents can always do a Google search if they stumble upon an phrase they aren’t familiar with, but the other option is asking their children, since these phrases can have different meanings for different people.

“Asking kids not only gives you great information, but it shows that you’re paying attention and sparks the conversation around their online behaviors, which is imperative.”

Micky Morrison, a mom of two in Islamorada, Florida, says she finds Internet acronyms “baffling, annoying and hilarious at the same time.”

She’s none too pleased that acronyms like “LOL” and “OMG” are being adopted into conversation, and already told her 12-year-old son — whom she jokingly calls “deprived,” since he does not have a phone yet — that acronym talk is not allowed in her presence.

But the issue really came to a head when her son and his adolescent friends got together and were all “ignoring one another with noses in their phones,” said Morrison, founder of BabyWeightTV.

“I announced my invention of a new acronym: ‘PYFPD.’ Put your freaking phone down.”

LOL!

But back to the serious issue at hand, below are 28 Internet acronyms, which I learned from Greer and other parents I talked with, as well as from sites such as NoSlang.com and NetLingo.com, and from Cool Mom Tech’s 99 acronyms and phrases that every parent should know.

After you read this list, you’ll likely start looking at your teen’s texts in a whole new way.

IWSN – I want sex now
GNOC – Get naked on camera
NIFOC – Naked in front of computer
PIR – Parent in room
CU46 – See you for sex
53X – Sex
9 – Parent watching
99 – Parent gone
1174′ – Party meeting place
THOT – That hoe over there
CID – Acid (the drug)
Broken – Hungover from alcohol
420 – Marijuana
POS – Parent over shoulder
SUGARPIC – Suggestive or erotic photo
KOTL – Kiss on the lips
(L)MIRL – Let’s meet in real life
PRON – Porn
TDTM – Talk dirty to me
8 – Oral sex
CD9 – Parents around/Code 9
IPN – I’m posting naked
LH6 – Let’s have sex
WTTP – Want to trade pictures?
DOC – Drug of choice
TWD – Texting while driving
GYPO – Get your pants off
KPC- Keeping parents clueless

She says research sho

Mississippi Skate Park Creates ‘New Model’ For Funding Public Projects

THE 20 BEST JOBS:la marbella_bowl contestFeatured ImageWIN a Mou...

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Thanks to tight deadlines, crowded inboxes, constant meetings, and pressure to perform, it’s easy to fall into the trap of working too much.And while it’s important to be dedicated to your career, finding time for a life outside of work is just as (or more) crucial.“As humans, we need other outlets in our lives, such as friends, family, and hobbies, to live the kind of lives that bring us greater satisfaction,” says Scott Dobrowski, a community expert at Glassdoor, a site where employees can review their jobs and employers.Glassdoor recently sifted through its data to find whichprofessions offer the most flexible schedules, the option to work from home, and allow employees to set their own schedules. In other words: the jobs that provide the best work-life balance.

Data scientist, SEO specialist, and tour guide top the list.

“By maintaining a healthy work-life balance, we see employees who tend to be satisfied in their jobs,” Dobrowski explains. Employees in these jobs are motivated and hard working, yet still avoid burning out, which is good for both the employee and employer.

20. Game Designer

 

Work-life balance score: 3.8

“Nice people with a high team spirit, a great work life balance, countless events, activities, and benefits and low hierarchies.” —Wooga Game Designer (Berlin, Germany)

19. Real Estate Broker

Work-life balance score: 3.8

“Flexible schedule, unlimited income, great work environment.” —Century 21 Real Estate Broker (location, n/a)

18. Carpenter

Work-life balance score: 3.8

“Lots of chances to move up or lateral moves if you don’t like what you are doing. Environment values family and having a life outside of work.” —Fluor Carpenter (Boulder, Colorado)

1frozen
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How a Canadian company is connecting youths to jobs, no degree required

How a Canadian company is connecting youths to jobs

A Canadian company called Raise Your Flag wants to help connect youths to meaningful work, like becoming a choreographer, without requiring them to get a post-secondary degree or diploma.Featured Image -- 4213

How Raise Your Flag works:

The program is online, open to anyone and completely free.

Participants can either identify what job they are interested in right now, or what kind of career they want to have in the future.

Take someone who wants to become a fashion designer, for example. Raise Your Flag will show them the steps in a potential career path, how you go from a retail sales associate in a fashion store, to a tailor’s assistant, to a pattern cutter, and so on.

“And then of course, at each step we show them the open job postings in their geographic location,” said Porter.

The organization also identifies and suggests various training opportunities from other groups that may be helpful along the way, such as an online course that would cost around $20 or $30 and teach them to use Photoshop to design patterns – whatever the training may be.

Alternatively, participants can start with a job they want to pursue right now, for example, they know the Shoppers Drug Mart down the street is hiring. Raise Your Flag would then show them all the different career paths that start with retail.

The organization works with partners who pay to promote their company as a viable career path that doesn’t require a degree.

When the group started talking to major national companies – like Tim Hortons, Air Canada, and the Canadian Armed Forces, for example – they discovered that all these companies had the same problem: How do we keep these young employees and communicate to them that there are future opportunities here for them?

What most found was that employees under the age of 30 generally leave within two years. One of the top reasons they cite for leaving was that they didn’t see a future with the company. Numerous studies seem to back that claim up.

A recent report from CivicAction lists “a lack of meaningful opportunities” as a major roadblock to youth finding employment. Though the unemployment rate for youth aged 15 to 24 is historically higher than adults (at last check sitting at 13.4 per cent compared to seven per cent overall), a Statistics Canada report states the gap between the two has widened in recent years, as youth employment hasn’t bounced back to its pre-recession level.

Companies insist there are future careers with them, “they’ve just done a terrible job of articulating that and laying it out to [young employees],” said Porter.

“So Raise Your Flag is a chance for [young employees] to lay out that future within their company – at each step of the way, what they can do if they come there eager to learn and ready to work really hard,” he said.

The problem with education:

One of the biggest obstacles Raise Your Flag comes up against is the education system.

Channeling Braveheart, Porter quipped, “the problem with education is that it’s filled with educators.”

He explained, “it’s exclusively filled with a group of people who took one post-secondary pathway.” To tell them that you can have a great career without a university or college degree, “they think that you’re personally attacking their degree and their decision, which isn’t the case,” Porter said.

Raise Your Flag isn’t anti-college or university, stressed Porter. “We’re anti people wasting time and money for something that they may not need.” He’d much rather see a young person go out into the working world and after three years of paid work decide to get more education, versus enrolling in a program after high school, coming out with crippling debt, only so say “ah, maybe that wasn’t worth it.”

Why kids these days need to get a j.o.b.

Porter’s number one tip for today’s youth is to get a job. Any job. Young people, he stressed, need to be engaged in work, and they need to try out a job for at least three to six months before they decide if they like it or not.

Porter recalled his first real job at a No Frills stocking shelves. From there he eventually managed a small team, then two departments, then the store. And it was through those experiences that he learned what he liked, what he didn’t like, how he worked best.

“Just collect all those crappy experiences, the cleaning up accidents in aisle four, dealing with customers who you don’t understand on the phone – all of that stuff, because it helps shapes our outlook on the type of work that we can do,” he said.

Porter also cautions against dumbing things down for youth and telling them simply to follow their passions.

“It’s so cliché and there’s not a lot of value in telling young people to follow their passion, because right now, they think their passion is Xbox, they think their passion is MTV.”

“When I was 15 I thought I was going to the NBA,” he said. But he was lucky enough to have a gym teacher who – rather than said “yes Ryan, follow your passion!” – suggested he tried out teaching a gym class at his co-op placement. From there, Porter discovered he really enjoyed teaching people new things.

Passion isn’t found, stressed Porter. “You discover passion…you earn passion – and then you bring it with you wherever you want to go.”