Underwater | Pterois Volitans

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Man underwater swims in a colorful coral reef with tropical fish
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Underwater | Reprobate

Interesting photojournalists.

dream, discover, design

Being a lover of photography myself, I’m always intrigued to see what other people put out there. On Instagram especially, people blog their daily activities or have a website in which they show what they do. Quite often, they get paid to produce certain pieces others do it as a hobby to share with people about themselves and what they do in the world. I know a few personal examples that I follow and scan through very frequently – purely because their images are so interesting and they make you want to look more into who they are and what they were doing at that point in time when they took the photo!

Sjana Elise Earp –

Sjana is an Australian girl who has got her fame from writing blogs, which had then developed to her creating a website and showing her lifestyle through images on Instagram. The majority of…

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Soul Impression

Rich Proctor Photography

Soul Impression
When my spirit is down
My world is dark
And I don’t know where to go
I come to where the magic happens
I let the glory shine in
And let it impress upon my world-wearied soul.
~ RBP ~

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Up for Discussion – Backing Up

Up for Discussion – Pictures by Leanne ColeSee through

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This post today is written by me (Leanne Cole) and has come out of something that recently happened to me.  It was something that was scary and has reminded me of how important it is not to keep all your eggs in one basket, so to speak.  Today’s Up for Discussion is going to address how important backing up can be.

I started taking photos seriously with a DSLR, I don’t know about 5 years ago, when I was taking photos of cycling.  My daughter was cycling, so I started taking photos of her and a few other people, then it progressed to me taking photos nearly every weekend at some cycling event or another.  During the weekends it could be nothing for me to take two or three thousand photos.  I think the most I ever took in one day was three thousand.  I was also selling them, so I had to have a back up of all my photos.  I became very concerned about it.  About 10 years ago I had a hard disk in a computer die.  My husband, Dave, had never felt my stuff was worth backing up, so he never put anything into place.  It isn’t a good feeling, I think it is a bit like being robbed, for months you remember new things you lost. He changed his tune after that.

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So  for the cycling photos, he bought two external drives, one the main one, the other the back up. Then they started filling up, so he did some investigations and decided to get a NAS.  Now don’t ask me to explain what it is, but it sits near the tv, has 4 drives in it, and is connected to the network, so anyone in the house can have access to it.  I can see photos from it from either computer.  When I am done with photos, I back them up onto the NAS, the images go on one disk and then they are automatically backed up onto another one.  It has been a great system, though I have worried about something happening with the NAS, like the house burning down, or it being stolen.  I have been trying to decide what to do.

We have 4 TBs of storage in the NAS and we filled them up.  Not just with my photos, but other things as well.  That is what caused the problems, we think.  We had purchased some more space in it, but Dave had been waiting for me to get things done first, and I was slow, I admit it.  Then when he finally started looking at the NAS, he made an announcement, “the NAS was dead”.  Who said men aren’t melodramatic?  I told him it better not be because I had 5 years of work on it, and I didn’t want to lose any of it.  He was a bit flippant about it, I have to say, not really sure he takes what I do seriously.

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http://leannecolephotography.com/

After putting in the other disk we had purchased, and a bit of mucking around he was able to get all my photos from the back up and it looks like I didn’t lose anything.  I think sometimes being married to a programmer can be more of a burden, they can do things in more complicated ways, and really if something happened to him, well, I would just about lose everything any way, I don’t know how to do things on the NAS.

Now, sorry, it is a long post today, but the end of it is that I really need to make sure I have better back up systems in place. I had quite a few sleepless nights last week, and I don’t want that to happen again.

I have been thinking, that while I have the NAS, I need to look at other things as well, so I don’t have all my eggs in one basket.  I have now purchased a 4TB external drive, and my photos are on it as well now.  I am going to leave that with a friend at her house.  Then in about a month I will purchase a second one, and then start swapping them over.  That way if something happens here, then she will always have a fairly up to date drive with my photos on it.  So far I have filled over 2TB.  I think I also need to be pickier about what I save.  I shouldn’t save everything, some of the photos are no good and I know I will never use them.

The other thing I have been looking at is the possibility of using some form of internet storage.  I haven’t made up my mind, though if I do, I will just start it from now and possibly only put photos that are really important to me.

I thought I would ask some people here on the internet what they thought.  I asked 4 guys who I think take a lot of photos.  I also thought that sometimes men and women do think differently about this and it might help to get a different view on it.

Welcome to the Jungle

I asked Victor Rakmil: My back-up system is relatively straight forward. Here’s the explanation: “I put effort into taking my photographs and processing them. I worry about the possibility of losing them. To solve the back up problem I use external mobile drives, not my computer hard drive. I import my photos into Lightroom in the DNG format, with copies in the original Nikon NEF format, to a second external drive (that way if by chance DNG is no longer a viable format I have my original Raw files). As I work on my files I copy the DNG drive to a third back-up drive and put that drive in a safe place. In the end I have three copies of all of my photos. With one set off-site.  Which reminds me, I have a drive to copy and take to the bank.  :)”

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Victor also gave me a link to a page talking about this and it had a survey asking people what they do.  Photo Backup Survey

I asked Robin Kent: On the subject of back-up, my approach is not particularly exotic, but it is one way to protect one’s image files from various disasters.   The cost of storage is relatively cheap today which helps because the size of my inventory is approaching4 Terabytes. My starting point is the computer platform which has three internal hard drives, and four external drives.  I no longer use a NAS solution, although I do have an Ethernet network with NAS capability.

laurent-melbourne-littlecollins-building-monochromeOne of the two internal drives is a 512 MB solid state drive (SSD) where Photoshop resides and processing occurs.  All image files, whether processed or not, are stored on the second internal hard drive, a 4 TB hard drive which is the Master Drive.  At this point I have 1 copy of my inventory.  From here the tactic is to create additional copies in case the prime drive fails.

The Master Copy is backed up using the standard Apple Time Machine back-up software. This is the Back-up drive (3rd internal drive) and would be used if a file restore is needed.  However, some experts feel that the Apple system is not totally reliable, so I don’t consider this drive as one of my copies.  I also have a simple back-up software application with an automatic schedule to make copies each day of my image files on two separate external 4 TB hard drives.  It adds new files since the last copy and records any changes made in existing files.  So at any given point in time, I have three connected copies on-site, two of which are no older than 24 hours.leannecole-klara-7353-4

The third step is off-site storage.  Mechanical failure is not the only danger, only the most likely one.  It doesn’t matter how many copies you have in your building if something happens to the building.  If I happen to be here when that event occurs, I could quickly detach the two external drives and leave, not something I could have done with my rack-mounted NAS drive.  But chances are I won’t be here.  So I have two additional 4TB drives which are stored in a separate location (my wife’s office) office about 10 miles away.  They are refreshed once a month.

I don’t use any of the “Cloud” services as a back-up solution because they are not reliable, nor secure despite their claims, and are subject to policy changes at any time.

I ask Benjamin Rowe as well: Backing up files can become an obsessive compulsive, although there is no perfect solution, anything can go wrong. I happen to work with two computers and part of my back up process lets me share the files across the two.

On my main computer I import my raw files to my second drive. When I have finished editing those files are archived on to an external hard drive. DNG copies of my raw files are also backed up on my cloud storage where I have access to them on my laptop. Also once I have finished editing I export full size Jpegs to a different cloud storage service and burn them onto DVDs.

LeanneCole-Alannah_AliceWhen traveling I pack two external drives; one that I can download images to while out shooting and another that I can copy the files to. I will also download them onto laptop for organising and editing. Backing up also takes place on my phone with all my pictures being backed up to the cloud and then once a month backed up to a hard drive. In case drives fail I have a recovery program that I can use to help rescue my files.

I tend to use different drives as well as different cloud storage services because if one fails there is another. I haven’t started using multiple drives backing each other up automatically, but I can see myself doing that in the future. What I need to work out is how to have access to files when there is no electricity.

Finally I asked Ray Laskowitz: I was exchanging emails with Leanne when she mentioned that she almost lost five years worth of work when her backup system failed. Luckily, her husband is a computer analyst so he’s been able to help her recover her files.

That’s scary. Very scary. And, I completely understand. I’m a Hurricane Katrina survivor. No. I didn’t go through all the scenes you may have seen on your news stations. I left a day prior to the storm making landfall. Even back then, I backed up my work on multiple sources. At the time I used external hard drives and CDs. I packed the hard drives into small Anvil cases and packed them securely in the car. I thought that was the right thing to do. It wasn’t.

Every one of of those external hard drives broke. I didn’t lose the data. But, the software that provides the connection to the computer was damaged. The computer could not find the hard drives when I tried to mount them. I was able to retrieve the data at a rather large cost.

I vowed that would never happen again.

Here’s what I learned. External hard drives are great… if they are portable. There’s a big difference between external desktop models and a small portable hard drives. Desktop hard drives are essentially the same hard drives that are used in a desktop computer. They are meant to stay in one place. Portable hard drives are very similar to the ones the are used in laptops. They can to be moved. I learned one more thing. Bigger is not necessarily better. For instance, according to statistics kept by the folks who monitor such things, 4 TB hard drives are almost three times likely to fail than 1 TB hard drives. I’m not sure why, but I suspect it has to do with the heat they generate as well as length of time in hard service — being used every day.

I also looked into RAID and NAS systems. They actually have pretty high failure rates. That’s fine if a hard drive breaks since they are supposed to be redundant. But, if the main link breaks, you run into the problems that Leanne had.

Of course there are CDs and DVDs, but they corrupt a lot faster than anybody anticipated unless you use gold media. That’s costly and you still really should back up your files twice. Besides, hard ware changes. You should reborn discs every few years.

Of course there are clouds, which are really just offsite servers. I use them, but don’t really trust them completely. Electricity can fail. Internet service providers can fail. I use them. But, not exclusively.

milkyway-sorrento-stars-back-beach So, here’s what I do.

I mix and match. I use two portable 1 TB hard drives at the same time. Once they are filled — not to their maximum storage capacity because that can cause problems too — one goes offsite to a safe deposit box, the other stays with me. I also use two clouds only for master files, one from Apple. The other from Adobe.

Here’s why.

It’s about workflow. There is no one correct workflow. What you organize depends on what photograph and how you work in the field. I download my RAW files to both portables. I put a third set of files on my desktop. Those are the ones I curate and edit. Those files become my masters. They also are uploaded to both portables and the clouds. Once that’s done, they are the files I experiment with… the ones that you might see on my blog, Storyteller. They go onto both hard drives as well.

When I’ve finished with everything, I have two sets of RAW files. Three sets of masters and two sets of experimental files. The funny thing is that I come from the film era. In those days, we had one set of “files.” Negatives and slides. Collections were big and bulky. They were very hard to move in the event of some disaster. Today, we have multiple back up methods. Use as many as you need.

Thank you to those guys, they have similar things, and some things are different.

I know this has been a long post, but it is an important post, and it is something that all of us photographers should be thinking about.  Do you want to risk losing everything? Do you have a backup system in place?  Is it good enough? I will try and answer questions, but I am hoping that Victor, Ben, Robin and Ray might pop in from time to time and answer questions.  I might even be able to get Dave to give some advice, you never know.

The photos I have put in this post are some of the ones I would have lost if I had not been able to recover my images.  They are some of my favourites, and some you have seen a few times.scsr-h20120512-1401

7 Ways to Practice Crazy Wisdom

7 Ways to Practice Crazy Wisdom: Fractal Enlightenment

http://www.68npt.com/

“Crazy wisdom is the philosophical worldview that recommends swimming against the tide, cheerfully seizing the short end of the stick,  embracing insecurity, honoring paradox, courting the unexpected, celebrating the unfamiliar, shunning orthodoxy, volunteering for tasks nobody else wants or dares to do, and breaking taboos in order to destroy their power. It’s the wisdom of those who turn the tables on despair by lampooning it, and who neither seek authority nor submit to it. To enlarge the soul, light up the brain, and liberate the spirit.” –Tom Robbins

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http://fractalenlightenment.com/

Do you ever feel like the little rebel inside you is being suppressed. Or that your inner revolutionary has been fooled into thinking that there’s no need for revolution. Or that your internal nonconformist has somehow conformed? Well, do not fear.

This article will be a breath of fresh air for each. It’s time to let your freak flag fly. Let your insurgent soul surge. Let your hidden ninja reveal itself in a puff of smoke. Don’t be serious, just be sincere. So without further ado, here are seven ways you can practice crazy wisdom.

1.) Swim against the tide

The Price Is Right

“Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it. Because what this world needs are people who have come alive.” –Howard Thurman

Go against the norm. Toss a monkey wrench into the status quo machinery. Take the “monk” out of “monkey” and interrogate it to the nth degree. Watch it buckle and bend against your monkey holiness. Laugh with the whole of your heart, then shake it off and find another typicality to atypically topple with your own unique typology. Swimming against the tide takes courage, but the joy gained from the disruption, especially from disrupting obsolete or unhealthy social structures, is worth the effort.

Royal Caribbean's cruise ship Allure of the Seas.
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It’s always worth the initial fear involved, and you’ll find that the more you practice going against the tide, the more you’ll be capable of transforming fear into  courage.

2.) Embrace insecurity

“We could never learn to be brave and patient, if there were only joy in the world.” –Helen Keller

Let yourself doubt. Let yourself crack open. The more you’re able to crack open, come back together, and then crack open again, the more you’ll be able to absorb the wisdom of the universe. Practice defensive pessimism, a phenomenon in which people imagine worst-case scenarios in order to manage their anxiety. There is wisdom in uncertainty that the certain will never ascertain.

Security is for the fearful. Don’t be fearful, be fearless. Dance with your insecurity like it was your first true love and it’s the last dance you’ll ever dance. Being honest with what makes us insecure counter-intuitively makes us more secure. Like David McRaney wrote, “You can’t improve the things you love if you never allow them to be imperfect.” And since we can never attain perfection anyway, there will always be the need to embrace insecurity and uncertainty.

3.) Honor paradox

“The point of philosophy is to start with something so simple as not to seem worth stating, and to end with something so paradoxical that no one will believe it.” –Bertrand Russell41efsroosbl-_sy450_1

We honor the paradox by giving it meaning, by being flexible and responsible with our own interpretation of it. At the end of the day, we are meaning-bringing creatures in an otherwise meaningless universe. It seems like semantic gymnastics, but it’s not. It really just comes down to the fact that we are perceiving an infinite reality using finite faculties. Because of this, paradox is inevitable. One of those paradoxes happens to be Meaning itself. Another one is Love. But what deliciously beautiful paradoxes they are. Reality itself is not a paradox, it is what it is. But Consciousness, and all the wonderful baggage that comes along with it, is a paradox. I would even go as far as to say: namaste, the paradox within me honors the paradox within you.

4.) Court the unexpected

“Let go of certainty. The opposite isn’t uncertainty. It’s openness, curiosity and a willingness to embrace paradox, rather than choose up sides. The ultimate challenge is to accept ourselves exactly as we are, but never stop trying to learn and grow.” –Tony Schwartz

Don’t suffer from the hell of expectation. Revel in the heaven of the unexpected instead. There’s a joy found in things not going according to plan that only those who don’t take things too seriously can feel. So don’t be self-serious. Be seized by the surprise. Be clutched by the beautiful crux of the cosmos. When your plans get dashed, roll with it, learn from it, be it, in the moment. Courting the unexpected is daring the universe to bewilder you.

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It’s tempting the Great Mystery into a cosmic tango. You might not know the steps, but so what. You’ll either figure it out or make a fool of yourself. Both can be equally fruitful. So grab the unexpected by the hand and give her a twirl. And it wouldn’t hurt you to do a couple of pirouettes in her honor. Like Henry David Thoreau said, “None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm.”

5.) Shun orthodoxy

“The priest is interested in the answers; the shaman is more interested in provoking you to ask the questions that will lead you into paradox and duality. The task of the shaman is not to pursue meaning but to create it, to bring the sacred to an otherwise profane and mundane reality. That takes a daily act of courage and a willingness to make mistakes.” –Alberto Villoldowild-man-eyes

Slap with the truth all who claim to have achieved enlightenment. If they get angry or offended then they are not on the path toward enlightenment. If they shrug it off and laugh and say “oh well, there is always more to learn,” then they are on the path toward enlightenment, and they understand that enlightenment is always a journey and never a destination. Rather than live for a destination, live within a destiny. Shun all who claim to have all the answers, embrace those who ask sacred questions.

The orthodoxy is a blind ox burdened by the weight of parochialism and ancient “good” made uncouth by the spoils of time. It is facile and cursory, at best. Stiff-arm it into the corner. Or, better yet, transform it into something profound by questioning it to the nth degree, mixing it up into mulch, and then watching it blossom into something beautiful, like when a flower blossoms from the muck and mire of manure.

6.) Volunteer for tasks nobody else 10646622_332776643550704_6466136143799982573_ndares to do

“There are two kinds of suffering. There is the suffering you run away from, which follows you everywhere. And there is the suffering you face directly, and so become free.” -Ajahn Chah

Imagine all the tasks that people are afraid of doing for fear of seeming crazy. Then narrow those tasks down to the most important, whatever they might be, preferably the ones that make your heart sing, and then go do them. Be proactive. Be the spark in the dried up kindling of the status quo, then fan the flames. Be the catalyst in their cauldron of catatonia, then stir the pot. Inform the uninformed. Forgive the unforgiven. Help the helpless.

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http://time.com/3486418/amazon-store/

Unroost all chickens that have come home to roost. No fear, just sincerity. Dive right into being an amoral agent within any immoral system and you may be surprised at how quickly it moralizes itself. As long as your volunteer work comes from a place of healthy intent then it will always be a sacred act.

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Brittany Maynard.Woman with brain cancer plans to end her life November 1

The Wonder of it All

Rich Proctor Photography

The Wonder
From the grandeur of the setting sun
To the charm of the greatly small
I live my life in constant gratitude
For the wonder of it all.
~ RBP ~

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Never Give Up by SilentMoment FIRES FORCING EVACUATION IN CALIFORNIA

FIRES FORCING EVACUATION IN CALIFORNIA:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaoTl8faOlk
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This was the only time I saw the sun in 6 days. I got up in complete darkness, heading to this amazing, remote location, which I’ve visited the day before. It was raining like most of the time and the mountains were covered in dark clouds. And then, the miracle happened! The sun came through the clouds for a few minutes and I was overwhelmed by the explosion of colors and shot intuitively a few images. I saw a lot of sunrises during my years as a landscape photographer, but nothing comparable.

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