Hurricane Ida Curfew set due to storm threat via Mississippi’s Best Community Newspaper

Hurricane Ida

Government officials have set an 8 p.m. curfew for Adams County due to dangerous travel conditions likely to result from Hurricane Ida. For the safety of employees and others, business owners are also being asked to to send employees home and close by 5 p.m. According to Tom McGehee, Adams County Emergency Operation Center Planning […]

Curfew set for Adams County due to storm threat — Mississippi’s Best Community Newspaper

Disaster warnings are as Reliable as the Humans Creating the Apps via Syntax Apps

1. Recycle the CO₂ content in the atmosphere: Just reducing the greenhouse gase emissions is not a permanent fix for the problem. Today Startups are going the extra mile and are trying to recycle the CO₂ in the atmosphere. More importantly a cost effective way needs to be found to store that amount of CO₂ which we pull out from the atmosphere.

2. Energy Storage: Wind and Solar energy are becoming cheaper but the issue is no electricity is generated when the sun is not shining or the wind is not blowing. Hence, the requirement for a storage system for electricity is even greater, either through molten salt, flow batteries to store such huge amounts of electricity.

3. Safe Driverless Cars: Companies have been testing autonomous vehicles for a long time now. But we have also witnesses accidents during the testing stages. Driverless Cars face a big challenge in situations like heavy traffic or during drastic weather conditions. Every transforming idea comes with an even greater amount of execution in mind. Safety is what Tech Companies should keep in mind while building Driverless Cars.

4. Earthquake Prediction: Number of Earthquakes, Tsunamis have been on the rise in nations such as Indonesia, Japan, India, Sri Lanka to name a few. Technology to preempt such natural disasters hours before impact could help save many lives and help in evacuation in time.

5. Artificial Intelligence: Recently a company named Boston Dynamics introduced an Embodied A.I. in the form of Atlas, a robot copying the actions of a soldier. It had a body but it can’t play Go, where AlphaGo beat the word’s best Go Player. AlphaGo is intelligent but lacks a body. Atlas has a body but lacks intelligence. Bringing or integration of both is any way will not only be a milestone in A.I. but just imagine an A.I. that could communicate in the Physical World just like Humans and Animals do.

1. Recycle the CO₂ content in the atmosphere: Just reducing the greenhouse gase emissions is not a permanent fix for the problem. Today Startups are going the extra mile and are trying to recycle the CO₂ in the atmosphere. More importantly a cost effective way needs to be found to store that amount of CO₂ […]

via Candidtech: Biggest Challenges Tech should solve — Syntax Apps

Fort St. John earthquakes were caused by fracking: BC Oil and Gas Commission —

The magnitude 3.4, 4.0 and 4.5 quakes struck about 20 kilometres south of the city on Nov. 29.

via Fort St. John earthquakes were caused by fracking: BC Oil and Gas Commission —

WATCH: Oak Park Home Engulfed In Flames Collapses As CBS2’s Tom Wait Reports Live — CBS Los Angeles

List of Closures and Evacuations | Real-Time Updates OAK PARK, Calif. (CBSLA) — The devastating Woolsey Fire continues to spread across the Southland, causing the evacuation of over 75,000 homes already in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. CBS 2’s Tom Wait witnessed the fire’s destructive power firsthand while reporting from Oak Park. (CBS2) In the video…

via WATCH: Oak Park Home Engulfed In Flames Collapses As CBS2’s Tom Wait Reports Live — CBS Los Angeles

These are the 10 costliest hurricanes in U.S. history – 3 are from 2017 — CW33 NewsFix

The year 2017 was the costliest ever for weather and climate disasters in the United States, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday, totaling $306 billion. The previous record year, 2005, saw $215 billion in disasters.

Three storms, Harvey, Irma and Maria all landed in the top five on NOAA’s updated list of the costliest U.S. tropical cyclones, released last week.

Highlighted by a string of hurricanes that pounded the southeastern U.S. coast in August and September, as well as devastating wildfires that torched large swaths of Northern and Southern California, 2017 saw 16 weather events that each topped a billion dollars in damage.

This ties 2011 for the most billion-dollar weather events to occur in a single year, but their extreme nature and the breadth of disaster types really set last year apart.

“In 2017, we have seen the rare combination of high disaster frequency, disaster cost and diversity of weather and climate extreme events,” said Adam Smith, lead researcher at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information.

“The U.S. has endured billion-dollar impacts from six of the seven disaster categories we track,” he said: drought, flood, freeze, severe storm, tropical cyclone, wildfire and winter storm. There hasn’t been a year when all seven disaster categories have seen a billion-dollar disaster.

2017 lacked only a billion-dollar winter storm — though we almost certainly had one in the first week of 2018 with the major nor’easter termed a “bomb cyclone.”

A hurricane season for the record books

Hurricanes are the costliest weather events, responsible for about half of the total losses among all U.S. billion-dollar disasters despite accounting for less than 20% of the total events since 1980.

This certainly proved true in 2017, when the U.S. and the Caribbean islands endured back-to-back-to-back devastating hurricanes — all of them now ranking among the top five costliest disasters — which were the main drivers behind the year becoming the costliest on record.

Here are the top ten costliest U.S. hurricanes (adjusted for inflation):

This aerial view shows a church damaged by hurricane Rita in Beaumont, Texas, 25 September 2005. Hurricane Rita pounded the US Gulf Coast, leaving widespread damage and more than one million people without power, but failed to deliver the feared repeat of hurricane Katrina’s devastation four weeks ago. (HECTOR MATA/AFP/Getty Images)

10. Rita (2005)

  • $23,680,000,000
  • Southwest Louisiana, North Texas

Judy Caseley retrieves photographs from a friend’s trailer that were damaged when Hurricane Wilma hit earlier in the morning October 24, 2005 in Chokoloskee, Florida. Wilma slammed into the South Florida coastline as a strong Category 3 hurricane. Caseley’s neighbor left in a hurry, leaving behind a lifetime of memories that Caseley felt she had to salvage. (Photo by Carlo Allegri/Getty Images)

9. Wilma (2005)

  • $24,320,000,000
  • South Florida

U.S. President George W. Bush walks with Orange Beach, Alabama, Mayor Steve Russo, past a destroyed condos on the Alabama beachfront as he visits the area, consoling victims, 19 September 2004, from Hurricane Ivan, the third hurricane to hit the larger area in the past month. Ivan’s devastating 12-day rampage that left at least 108 dead in the United States and the Caribbean. (PAUL J.RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

8. Ivan (2004)

  • $27,060,000,000
  • Alabama, Northwest Florida

In this handout provided by the U.S. Air Force, an Air Force Reserve pararescueman from the 920th Rescue Wing scans the landscape of Nederland, Texas in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike, 13 September 2008. Deployed with aircrews and aircraft from Patrick Air Force Base, Fla., the pararescuemen rescued 17 people Sept. 13 from the small Texas town. (Photo by Paul Flipse/US Air Force via Getty Images)

7. Ike (2008)

  • $34,800,000,000
  • Texas, Louisiana

A group of people sift 28 August 1992 through the rubble of a house that was directly in the path of a 26 August tornado spawned by Hurricane Andrew. Louisiana governor Edwin Edwards has estimated property damage from the hurricane from 70 to 100 million US dollars, and at least 200 million US dollars in damage to the sugar crop. (PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

6. Andrew (1992)

  • $47,790,000,000
  • Southeast Florida, Louisiana

Destroyed trailers wait to be cleaned up at the Sunshine Key RV Resort where residents are still not allowed on September 16, 2017 in Marathon, Florida. The Federal Emergency Management Agency reported that 25 percent of all homes in the Florida Keys were destroyed and 65 percent sustained major damage when they took a direct hit from Hurricane Irma. (Photo by Angel Valentin/Getty Images)

5. Irma (2017)

  • $50,000,000,000
  • Florida

Cars piled on top of each other at the entrance to a garage on South Willliam Street in Lower Manhattan October 31, 2012 in New York as the city begins to clean up after Hurricane Sandy. (STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

4. Sandy (2012)

  • $70,200,000,000
  • Mid-Atlantic & Northeast

Members of the U.S. Army 1st Special Forces Command deliver boxes of M.R.E’s and water up a makeshift ladder to people that were cut off after the bridge collapsed when Hurricane Maria swept through the island on October 5, 2017 in Utuado, Puerto Rico. The neighborhood was cut off from help for about 2 weeks after the category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

3. Maria (2017)

  • $90,000,000,000
  • Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands

Residents evacuate by boat on September 3, 2017 in Houston, Texas after Hurricane Harvey slammed into the city. Harvey was the first Category 4 storm to make landfall in the US since Hurricane Charley in 2004, unleashing record rainfall that quickly flooded the city. (Getty)

2. Harvey (2017)

  • $125,000,000,000
  • Texas, Louisiana

Flood waters from Hurricane Katrina cover a cemetery 30 August, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (POOL/AFP/Getty Images)

1. Katrina (2005)

  • $160,000,000,000
  • Southeast Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi

For the complete list, see the NOAA report.

CNN contributed to this article.

The year 2017 was the costliest ever for weather and climate disasters in the United States, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday, totaling $306 billion. The previous record year, 2005, saw $215 billion in disasters. Three storms, Harvey, Irma and Maria all landed in the top five on NOAA’s updated list of the costliest U.S. tropical cyclones, released last week. Highlighted by a string of hurricanes that pounded the southeastern U.S. coast in August and September, as well […]

via These are the 10 costliest hurricanes in U.S. history – 3 are from 2017 — CW33 NewsFix

1,000+ Hawaii Residents have been forced to evacuate their Homes as Lava flow continues to spread on the state’s Big Island

More than 1,000 Hawaii residents have been forced to evacuate their homes as a dangerous lava flow continues to spread on the state’s Big Island. CBS News reports on CBSN about why this lava flow is so unusual.

 

An Erupting Volcano In Bali Has Prompted Mass Evacuations And Stranded Thousands Of Travelers — via CNN / UPROXX

After weeks of tell-tale rumbles, Mount Agung is spewing ash clouds over Bali while residents and travelers fear for the worst. The Indonesian resort island saw the volcano erupt at least three times over the course of Saturday night and Sunday. In the process, the volcano shot ashes 19,000 feet high, according to CNN. The New York Times further reports that officials designated an area of six miles surrounding the volcano for mandatory evacuations, which has resulted in 24,000 people flocking from their homes and hotels.

To further complicate matters, especially for tourists, the island’s international airport has been closed for safety reasons. As a result, approximately 7,000 passengers saw cancellation of their flights. And on Monday, matters may grow worse — a realization that has prompted officials to prep for an “imminent” massive eruption by raising the alert classification:

Indonesia’s Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation raised its aviation notice from a red alert to a green one on Monday, indicating the potential for a larger eruption is imminent.

Over the weekend, residents were evacuated from 224 points around the island while Lombok International Airport on Pulau Lombok, the island due east of Bali, closed temporarily, said Ari Ahsan, spokesman for Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali … amid worsening conditions Monday, Jetstar Airways canceled all flights in and out of Bali.

The last time (1963) that Mount Agung saw a significant eruption, at least 1,100 people lost their lives. However, the latest rounds of tremors commenced in September 2016, which saw over 145,000 people evacuate. Since that time, businesses surrounding Mount Agung have been feeling the crunch as tourists increasingly avoided the area. Monday’s impending “green” alert is considered a Level 4 classification, although the National Board for Disaster Management says that the island’s condition remains “safe” for the moment.

(Via CNN & New York Times)

After weeks of tell-tale rumbles, Mount Agung is spewing ash clouds over Bali while residents and travelers fear for the worst. The Indonesian resort island saw the mountain erupt at least three times over the course of Saturday night and Sunday. In the process, the volcano shot ashes 19,000 feet high, according to CNN. The…

Featured image courtesy of Yahoo

via An Erupting Volcano In Bali Has Prompted Mass Evacuations And Stranded Thousands Of Travelers — UPROXX

How Cuba and Puerto Rico responded to their hurricanes — Repeating Islands

Will Grant (BBC) writes about the differences and similarities between Cuba and Puerto Rico’s responses to Hurricane Irma and Hurricane Maria, respectively: If Hurricane Irma hitting Cuba and Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico had one thing in common it was that – despite ample warning – they seemed to take many by surprise. It was […]

via How Cuba and Puerto Rico responded to their hurricanes — Repeating Islands

Puerto Rico is still a disaster zone — Repeating Islands

Ana Campoy (Quartz) writes that Puerto Rico is still a disaster zone, three weeks after Hurricane Maria: Hurricane Maria tore through Puerto Rico on Sept. 20. Three weeks later, many residents still live like it’s the day after the storm made landfall. More than 90% of the island remains without electricity, and roughly a third without water […]

via Puerto Rico is still a disaster zone — Repeating Islands

Another Rockslide At Yosemite’s El Capitan

A day after one person was killed and another one was injured in a rockslide at El Capitan in Yosemite, another rock slide has happened, officials confirm.

Source: Another Rockslide At Yosemite’s El Capitan
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK (CBS13) – A day after one person was killed and another one was injured in a rockslide at El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, another rock slide has happened, officials confirm.

Park officials issued a statement that reads: “Northside Drive exiting Yosemite Valley is closed due to a new rockfall off of El Capitan. Use Southside Drive to exit Yosemite Valley.”

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Yosemite National Pk ✔@YosemiteNPS
Northside Drive exiting Yosemite Valley is closed due to a new rockfall off of El Capitan. Use Southside Drive to exit Yosemite Valley.
4:13 PM – Sep 28, 2017
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A reporter at the park witnessed the slide and posted photos along with a statement: “#BREAKING: Another rock fall near #ElCapitan in @YosemiteNPS. My photographer and I witnessed the whole ordeal, it was so loud, thunderous.”

 

Tens Of Thousands Flee As Hurricane Harvey Closes In On Texas


        Surfline Surf Forecasts

 HOUSTON (AP) — With time running out, tens of thousands of people fled from the path of Hurricane Harvey Friday as it picked up strength and took aim at a wide swath of the Texas Gulf Coast that includes oil refineries, chemical plants and dangerously flood-prone Houston, the nation’s fourth-largest city.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott warned that the monster system would be “a very major disaster,” and the menacing forecasts drew fearful comparisons to Hurricane Katrina, one of the nation’s deadliest.

“We know that we’ve got millions of people who are going to feel the impact of this storm,” said Dennis Feltgen, a spokesman and meteorologist for the National Hurricane Center. “We really pray that people are listening to their emergency managers and get out of harm’s way.”

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Satellite image of Hurricane Harvey before it makes landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017. (NOAA)

Satellite image of Hurricane Harvey before it makes landfall in Texas on August 25, 2017. (NOAA)

Aside from savage winds and storm surges, the system was expected to drop prodigious amounts of rain. The resulting flooding, one expert said, could be “the depths of which we’ve never seen.”

Galveston-based storm surge expert Hal Needham of the private firm Marine Weather and Climate said forecasts indicated that it was “becoming more and more likely that something really bad is going to happen.”

At least one researcher predicted heavy damage that would linger for months or longer.

“In terms of economic impact, Harvey will probably be on par with Hurricane Katrina,” said University of Miami senior hurricane researcher Brian McNoldy. “The Houston area and Corpus Christi are going to be a mess for a long time.”

Scientists warned that Harvey could become powerful enough to swamp counties more than 100 miles (161 kilometers) inland and stir up dangerous surf as far away as Alabama and the Florida Panhandle, more than 500 miles from the projected landfall.

It may also spawn tornadoes. Even after weakening, the system could spin out into the Gulf and regain strength before hitting Houston a second time Wednesday as a tropical storm.

Rain bands from the storm began pelting the coast early Friday. By afternoon, the storm was about 115 miles (185 kilometers) southeast of Corpus Christi, moving 10 mph (17 kph) to the northwest.

All seven Texas counties on the coast from Corpus Christi to the western end of Galveston Island ordered mandatory evacuations from low-lying areas. Four counties ordered full evacuations and warned there was no guarantee of rescue for people staying behind.

Voluntary evacuations have been urged for Corpus Christi and for the Bolivar Peninsula, a sand spit near Galveston where many homes were washed away by the storm surge of Hurricane Ike in 2008.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has expressed concern that not as many people are evacuating compared with previous storms. He said Friday that there was still time for coastal residents to get out of Harvey’s path, but they must leave immediately.

Fueled by warm Gulf of Mexico waters, Harvey became a Category 3 storm Friday afternoon, with maximum sustained winds of 120 mph (193.11 kph), the hurricane center said.

It was expected to continue gathering strength before coming ashore late Friday or early Saturday, possibly as the fiercest hurricane to hit the U.S. in nearly a dozen years. The National Hurricane Center said Harvey had the potential for winds up to 125 mph (201 kph) and storm surges of 12 feet (4 meters).

Landfall was predicted near Rockport, a fishing-and-tourist town about 30 miles northeast of Corpus Christi.

The heavy rain could turn many communities into “essentially islands” and leave them isolated for days, said Melissa Munguia, deputy emergency management coordinator for Nueces County.

Harvey was projected to drop up to 3 feet (0.91 meter) of rain over several days. The rain and the storm surge could collide like a car and a train, particularly in the Galveston and Houston areas, Needham said.

“Essentially there’s absolutely nowhere for the water to go,” he said. Galveston Bay, where normal rain runs off to, will already be elevated.

The heavy rain was expected to extend into Louisiana, driven by counter-clockwise winds that could carry water from the Gulf of Mexico far inland. Forecasts called for as much as 15 inches in southwest Louisiana over the next week, and up to 6 inches in the New Orleans area.

Harvey grew quickly Thursday from a tropical depression into a Category 1 hurricane, and then Category 2 hurricane early Friday. The last storm to reach Category 3 hit the U.S. was Hurricane Wilma in October 2005 in Florida.

Superstorm Sandy, which pummeled New York and New Jersey in 2012, never had the high winds and had lost tropical status by the time it struck. But it was devastating without formally being called a major hurricane.

The Texas governor activated about 700 members of the state National Guard ahead of Harvey making landfall.

Harvey would be the first significant hurricane to hit Texas since Ike in September 2008 brought winds of 110 mph (177 kph) to the Galveston and Houston areas, inflicting $22 billion in damage. It would be the first big storm along the middle Texas coast since Hurricane Claudette in 2003 caused $180 million in damage.

It’s taking aim at the same vicinity as Hurricane Carla, the largest Texas hurricane on record. Carla came ashore in 1961 with wind gusts estimated at 175 mph and inflicted more than $300 million in damage. The storm killed 34 people and forced about 250,000 people to evacuate.

© Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Source: Tens Of Thousands Flee As Hurricane Harvey Closes In On Texas

Sinkhole in Seattle

SEATTLE — Officials are trying to determine the scope of an “apparent sinkhole” that appeared Thursday morning in the city’s Queen Anne neighborhood, Seattle Department of Transportation spokesperson Norm Mah said. The apparent sinkhole was noticed Thursday morning on 5th Avenue near the intersection of W. Comstock Street. The hole is about 3-feet wide. Mah…

via ‘Apparent sinkhole’ appears in Seattle; street closed — Q13 FOX News

Mayor: Death toll in Tennessee wildfires now 13 — WAVY-TV

GATLINBURG, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee mayor has confirmed that 13 people have died from wildfires, including one person who appears to have had heart attack fleeing the flames. Copyright 2016 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

via Mayor: Death toll in Tennessee wildfires now 13 — WAVY-TV

VIDEO: Stunning drone video of Oregon sinkholes

Drone footage gives a bird’s eye view of the massive sinkhole in Harbor, Oregon.

VIDEO: Stunning drone video of Oregon sinkholes

HARBOR, Ore. (AP/WATE) – Transportation officials say a massive sinkhole has opened near a highway along the coast of southern Oregon.

Kyle Rice, posted a YouTube video of drone footage of the massive sinkhole from a bird’s eye view. Oregon. The Oregon Department of Transportation says the sinkhole off Highway 101 has been plaguing the Curry County town of Harbor since heavy rains last month.

A contractor was working on it Thursday when the erosion started to accelerate on a nearby road. Officials say the sinkhole didn’t swallow any vehicles, and there were no injuries. Signs have been placed along the highway directing traffic to a detour. ODOT spokesman Jared Castle says drivers can expect delays of five to 10 minutes.

The agency plans to get bids from contractors so repairs can start quickly, but repairs could be upwards of $4 million according to ODOT. Castle says ODOT wants the road partially opened within a week, but the entire repair could take eight weeks.

Source: VIDEO: Stunning drone video of Oregon sinkholes

No one hurt when Jeep cracks through icy Indiana lake

It happened Tuesday night on Tamarack Lake at the Kingsbury Fish and Wildlife Area.

Source: No one hurt when Jeep cracks through icy Indiana lake