10 Reasons To Get Out And Be In Nature — A Pursuit of Life –

Nature is alive and full of high vibration healing energy. With technology having taken over the world, we are full of radiation and health depleting substances. We have built walls between us and the outdoor world. The majority of people spend up to 90% of their time indoors. We get so wrapped up with work, […]

via 10 Reasons To Get Out And Be In Nature — A Pursuit of Life – Barefoot&HighHeeled

Mt. Washington Meadows — John Carr Outdoors

Welcome to John Carr Outdoors! Please visit the blog and follow. The follow button can be found at the bottom of the page. If you are seeing this on Facebook, click the link to visit the blog to see all of the photos. Mt. Washington Sunshine and crisp air at the Pacific Crest Trail south […]

via Mt. Washington Meadows — John Carr Outdoors

Mt Hood Ridable Through the Summer

Hi there, bloggers! Continuing with our nature-themed road trip the following day, my family and I took the car south of Hood River to Mount Hood, which is actually a potentially-active volcano and the tallest one in the state of Oregon. At over 11,000 feet (3500 meters), its snow-capped peaks make for the iconic, picture-perfect […]

via Destination: Mount Hood, Oregon — The Finicky Cynic

Uinta-Wasatch-Cache I — Making memories

Summer is long gone, but I still have some pictures from my holidays that I haven’t shared yet. I will mix and divide them between two blog posts. This canyon road goes through Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest all the way from Utah to Wyoming. There are countless opportunities for hiking, but with our newborn baby we only […]

via Uinta-Wasatch-Cache I — Making memories

Happy Thanksgiving: Perspectives on Life, the Universe and Everything

Little red rascals I blame you Amazing beauty makes heart melt Commence love journey there is no guilt Adorn the ring with your petals Flying in the air heart nicely settles Big day comes and you are everywhere Making us feel blessed bedroom, kitchen, stairs Life truly commences you are not behind Honeymoon, blue moon […]

via Little red rascals — Perspectives on Life, the Universe and Everything

A Portrait of the Plains: Documenting A Changing Landscape

Beautiful: Absolutely Fabulous: 2015-09-10-1441917814-3519004-dsc_8907.jpg

Fourchette Creek
by Robin Walter

Morning light spills
through grass thick
with dew,
small whorls of dust
rise
from hooves
stamping their lives
into this ground.
Listen,

I rise
to the clatter
of birds:
small,
fierce,
and brown.

2015-09-10-1441917952-4493945-DSC_2318.jpg

2015-09-10-1441918074-4607900-DSC_2953.jpg

2015-09-10-1441918194-3820192-DSC_4306.jpg

2015-09-10-1441919184-3628301-dsc_9614.jpg

2015-09-10-1441919399-5494386-img_9201.jpg

2015-09-10-1441921638-6126796-dsc_0124.jpg

2015-09-10-1441921035-6407617-img_9469.jpg

Emilio Cogliani

Fourchette Creek
by Robin Walter

Morning light spills
through grass thick
with dew,
small whorls of dust
rise
from hooves
stamping their lives
into this ground.
Listen,

I rise
to the clatter
of birds:
small,
fierce,
and brown.

2015-09-10-1441917814-3519004-dsc_8907.jpg

2015-09-10-1441917893-7041547-dsc_0652.jpg

2015-09-10-1441917952-4493945-DSC_2318.jpg

2015-09-10-1441918074-4607900-DSC_2953.jpg

2015-09-10-1441918194-3820192-DSC_4306.jpg

2015-09-10-1441919184-3628301-dsc_9614.jpg

2015-09-10-1441919399-5494386-img_9201.jpg

2015-09-10-1441921638-6126796-dsc_0124.jpg

2015-09-10-1441921035-6407617-img_9469.jpg

This blog is part of an ongoing series following the Rediscover the Prairie expedition, a horseback journey across the Great Plains. To learn more please visit http://ift.tt/1B02Abg
All photos © Robin Walter or Sebastian Tsocanos. All rights reserved.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.


from Green – The Huffington Post http://ift.tt/1QDVvXP

View original post

Claim: Fungus Can Help Plants Tolerate Heat

Watts Up With That?

This is a photograph of Morning Glory Pool from Aug. 23, 2012. Credit Joseph Shaw, Montana State University This is a photograph of Morning Glory Pool from Aug. 23, 2012.
Credit
Joseph Shaw, Montana State University

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

Scientists studying mechanisms by which plants growing in hot geothermal soils like Yellowstone National Park tolerate extreme heat, claim they have discovered symbiotic fungi which impart significant heat tolerance to a wide range of plants.

According to Grist;

… But there’s a lesser-known type of fungus that actually grows inside the bodies of most, if not all, plants, inhabiting the empty spaces between cells. Fungi that do this are known as endophytes, and they’re what Rodriguez and Redman found were the key to those plants surviving in Yellowstone.

Alone, neither the fungus nor the plants could survive temperatures higher than about 100 degrees F. But with their powers combined, they could somehow tolerate the extreme heat of geothermal soils. What’s more, the plants infected with these…

View original post 147 more words

Vaquita population may be down to 50

Summit County Citizens Voice

Illegal fishing drives species toward extinction

asdf A vaquita in the Gulf of California. Photo courtesy NOAA/Paula Olsen.

vaquita habitat map Vaquitas live only in the northern end of the Gulf of California, where they are threatened by illegal fishing.

By Bob Berwyn

FRISCO — Illegal gillnet fishing in the northern Gulf of California continued to take a toll on endangered vaquita porpoises the past few years, according to a new report suggesting that as few as of 50 vaquitas remain.

The report, from the Committee for the Recovery of the Vaquita (CIRVA), is based on acoustic detection surveys, which is the best way to count the small porpoises. Based on the most recent survey, the scientists concluded an apparent 42 percent drop in the vaquita population from 2013 to 2014, when scientists estimated the population at less than 100.

View original post 661 more words

In search of Scotland’s best beach via Julian Worker / Writer

On a road trip along Scotland’s north-west coast Kevin Rushby and family search for great swimming and wild camping spots – and a legendary beach, Sandwood Bay, at the tip of the countryMaddy and Kevin explore a the opening of a gorge at Applecross.

I first heard of it many years ago while sitting on a beach in the Far East. We had palm trees, white sand and aquamarine water where turtles swam – and there was a Scotsman, freckled and sunburned, arguing that his homeland had better. “Like Sandwood Bay,” he said. “Best beach in the world – and it feels like the last one, too. It’s a hike to get there. You should make the pilgrimage.”368c648c-546b-4ed2-b9c1-838a2afeb85b-2060x1236

The name stuck in my mind and, over the years, other people mentioned the place: its legendary beauty, its wonderful isolation, and its burgeoning reputation. But it was not until I was searching the west coast for wild-swimming spots between Applecross and Cape Wrath that I found its actual location: the last splash of yellow sand before the top north-west corner of Britain, with a four-mile footpath snaking across the hills to reach it. The whole nature of the trip changed right then. We would do the pilgrimage, working our way north, searching for great swimming and wild-camping spots, and finish at the ultima thule, the legendary goal of wilderness lovers: Sandwood Bay.
http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2015/may/10/scotland-beach-swimming-wild-camping

Julian Worker Travel - A few ideas for your next trip in every direction

On a road trip along Scotland’s north-west coast Kevin Rushby and family search for great swimming and wild camping spots – and a legendary beach, Sandwood Bay, at the tip of the country.

View original post

Smiley face

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

Most people don’t understand the plight of Earth and all living things. They go about their daily lives without so much as a care about the world around them. But that myopia has led us to the situation we are in today, which is dire. Burying our heads in the sand is no longer an option. We must face reality. Now.

Our natural resources are finite, not endless. We depend on nature to supply us with fresh water, but as the climate warms, we cannot rely on melting snow that never fell. The atmosphere and air we breathe is under constant threat from pollution and other byproducts we humans create in our endless quest for a lifestyle filled with modern conveniences. The delicate balance of biodiversity that holds our ecosystems in check is precipitously hanging on the edge of the cliff, with only a few claws gripping the edge. These are such an overwhelming problems that most people don’t know what to do.

Changing of the world is not easy. We must start by changing our own personal behavior. We must accept the notion we can be happy with fewer material possessions, and success is not gauged by financial wealth but by the quality of the relationships we share with other people, animals and nature. Only then will the Earth’s situation begin to improve.

To facilitate this major shift in paradigm, we need everyone to buy in, including our governments and businesses. As leaders driving our society forward, they will need to be at the forefront of implementing this change, and they need to do so rapidly. We must demonstrate our desire for this change by voting in elections for the people who understand Earth’s problems and are committed to solving them. We must spend our dollars with the companies who make products in an ethical, sustainable manner.

In Namibia, the conservation programs we administer throughCheetah Conservation Fund integrate people’s needs and livelihoods with the needs of the land and the environment in which they live. We believe that by looking at the community as a whole and carefully addressing the needs of all living creatures, we can maintain the delicate balance of biodiversity and conserve the ecosystem for generations to come.

To celebrate Earth Day, I encourage you to engage others around you in discussion about our basic human values and the definition of happiness. I believe you will find that many more people than expected will agree that less is more, and that true happiness is not found in a new car or the latest technological gadget, but in the connections we have to the living creatures whose lives are supported by our planet. Even if they do not agree, you will have challenged their way of thinking and perhaps planted the seed of behavior change that will take root and one day bloom. This is a great way of showing respect for the Earth on April 22, 2015. By banding together on this day with this mission in mind, a small group of thoughtful, committed people can indeed change the world.

From the perspective of Founder and Executive Director of Cheetah Conservation Fund — by engaging in these discussions, you will also be helping ensure the cheetah and other endangered species have a place on Earth both today, and in the future.

Happy Earth Day!

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

from Green – The Huffington Post http://ift.tt/1EbLMB9

Reader Story: Back To The Sea

The Fickle Heartbeat

Back To The Sea

Shared by Arl’s World.

A True Story of love and loss and new beginnings …

The sea was where she always went to be alone with her thoughts. She liked looking out over the ocean, enjoyed watching the waves dance upon the shore. The warm sun caressed her skin. The cool ocean breeze blowing through her hair gave her a sense of freedom. She had been to this particular spot a million times before. There were so many happy memories of good times past; friends, family, relationships. She felt grounded here, calm and at peace. She needed some time to think, to reflect, ponder on all that happened to her in the last year. She left to get away from him, to start over. But even here, far away from him, he clouded her thoughts. The pain was still fresh. She was glad to be back home, back…

View original post 877 more words