Volunteer with Sloths

Famous the world over for their sluggish nature and comical facial expressions, sloths are revered amongst animal enthusiasts. These slow moving creatures are coming under increasing pressure in their natural rainforest homes due to rapid deforestation, resulting in a loss of habitat and enhanced exposure to predators. Unless something changes soon, sloth numbers will continue to fall. It is for this reason that volunteering with sloths could be a vital and rewarding way to spend your holiday!Sloths are herbivorous mammals that have been living in the forests of the Americas for over 60 million years, and here at The Great Projects we can offer you the chance to volunteer with them at a rescue and rehabilitation centre deep in the Costa Rican jungle.

SLOTHS AT A GLANCE

ENDANGERED STATUS

Not endangered/endangered

NUMBER REMAINING IN THE WILD

Dependent on species

ENDEMIC REGION

The Americas

HOW ENDANGERED ARE SLOTHS?

There are two different types of sloth and six different species. Of those, the pygmy sloth is critically endangered and the maned sloth is vulnerable. The other species are all classed as of least concern, but unless action is taken sooner rather than later this could change as deforestation continues to accelerate in the regions within which the sloths live.

Pygmy sloth numbers are thought to be as low as 100 and this is an indication of what could happen to the other species if action is not taken now.

THREATS SLOTHS ARE FACING

The health of the world’s sloth population is entirely dependent on the health of the world’s rainforests and this symbiotic relationship could prove disastrous to the sloths if deforestation continues at its current rates.

Sloths need forests full of trees to survive, and without them they become exposed to the forest floor where they are vulnerable to the many predators that share the forests with them. Sloths are defenceless to fend off predators when this happens, and that is why trees are so crucial to their survival.

FAST FACTS
  • Even though the two different types of sloths are named the two-toed sloth and three toed sloth, they all actually have three toes! Their names are actually in reference to the claws on their front limbs!
  • We all know sloths move very slowly, but did you know that on land they move at just 2 meters per minute? They are slightly faster up in the trees where they can move at 3 meters a minute!
  • Sloths have very long tongues, and some can stretch up to 10-12 inches out of their mouths!

Projects DO MORE

 

Published by Bing Wildlife Foundation

Other areas of interest for publishing include: Industrial Automation | Environmental Optimization | Space | Forensics | Logistics Favorite quote: "Know what you don't know" (Someone, 2020). Jessica attended the University of San Diego’s lawyer’s assistant program immediately obtaining her undergraduate degree. She worked as a legal assistant while she pursued her master’s in forensic science. After obtaining her MS. degree she continued to work in the legal field for years till she got involved in the pre-planning business. She is working on her PhD in forensic psychology at GCU: Her current PhD focus of analysis is assisting in the process of perfecting our current LIFE EXPECTANCY CALCULATOR to include ELEVATION / LONGITUDE / LATITUDE / POPULATION DENSITY and NUTRITION variables and their relationship to life span and quality of life to produce a dissertation topic that focuses on solutions to the problem. Improving educational skills training can elevate quality of life while raising life expectancy. (Klocko, et al., 2015). A qualitative approach, utilizing both quantitative statistics over time and qualitative population sampling, would best represent all angles of this topic (Stimpson & Walker, 2020). Reference: Klocko, B. A., Marshall, S. M., & Davidson, J. F. (2015). Developing practitioner-scholar doctoral candidates as critical writers. Journal of Higher Education Theory and Practice, 15(4), 21-31.

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